Today: 18.Jan.2018

Steven Chu, U.S. Secretary of Eergy and Nobel Laureate: Climate change is real, and it’s happening now. “There is compelling evidence that Earth’s climate is changing and humans are responsible for it. We only have one chance at correcting it and we have to do it,” Chu presented decades of satellite data that show how human activities are affecting the global climate pattern. “Glacier melting is accelerating and the sea level is rising,” The good news is that new technological solutions are being developed in the area of air filtration using HEPA filters and novel techniques that trap particles using electric charge. He predicts the price of solar-generated electricity will continue to drop from 3 cents per kilowatt-hour in 2020 to 2 cents per kWh by 2035 or 2040.

Bryan Leyland, founding secretary and energy issues adviser for the International Climate Science Coalition (ICSC). Tom Harris is the ICSC’s executive director. Modern highly efficient coal-fired power plants with stack gas cleanup – the kind that can be built all over the world – are as clean as they can be. Their emissions consist of water, CO2 and nitrogen. The stack gas cleanup removes virtually all the real pollutants, especially sulphur dioxide and nitrous oxides.

Published in Energy Today

Chris Mooney, Washington Post: The climate change simulations that best capture current planetary conditions are also the ones that predict the most dire levels of human-driven warming. Under a high warming scenario in which large emissions continue throughout the century, the models as a whole give a mean warming of 4.3 degrees Celsius (or 7.74 degrees Fahrenheit), plus or minus 0.7 degrees Celsius, for the period between 2081 and 2100. But the best models gave an answer of 4.8 degrees Celsius (8.64 degrees Fahrenheit), plus or minus 0.4 degrees Celsius. Overall, the change amounted to bumping up the projected warming by about 15 percent.

John Holdren, Science Advior to President Barack Obama: This talk addresses

The character of the energy challenge.

The two toughest problems: 1) transportation with less oil. 2) economic aspirations with less CO2.

What needs to be done. What the Obama Administration is doing.

The role of nuclear energy: The future of fission. The future of fusion.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

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