Today: 20.Feb.2019
17.Feb.2019 Written by

Andrew Follett, energy and science reporter for The Daily Caller: Solar panels create 300 times more toxic waste per unit of electricity generated than nuclear power plants. They use heavy metals, including lead, chromium and cadmium, which can harm the environment. The hazards of nuclear waste are well known and can be planned for. But very little has been done to mitigate solar waste issues.

13.Feb.2019 Written by

Michael Shellenberger, Founder - President of Environmental Progress: If solar and wind farms are needed to protect the natural environment, why do they so often destroy it?

11.Feb.2019 Written by

James Temple, writer for MIT technology Review: Fluctuating solar and wind power require lots of energy storage, and lithium-ion batteries seem like the obvious choice—but they are far too expensive to play a major role. Relying on renewables alone significantly inflates the cost of overhauling energy. At current prices, a battery storage system of that size would cost more than $2.5 trillion. Repeat that every time the batteries are worn out.

Richard McPherson, electrical power and grid security expert: America is now living with a horrible electricity supply system. At the same time the nationwide system is vulnerable to the effects of weather, humans, EMP and solar events. A situation created by politicians for their benefits. A system, China, Russia, North Korea and their proxies love.

08.Feb.2019 Written by

Eric Jelinski, past president of Environmentalists for Nuclear - Canada, farmer, environmentalist, university lecturer with degrees in mechanical, chemical and nuclear engineering: The question is really not, “Who can build nuclear?” but, “What does it take to build a nuclear plant,” and “How to build nuclear keeping within the capability of your country?” Here is a summary for pressure tube heavy water reactors, PTHW, developed in Canada and appropriate for other countries similar to Canada in the 1970s../p>

07.Feb.2019 Written by

Jack Ponton, Emeritus Professor of Engineering at the University of Edinburgh, Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering: Most renewable energy enthusiasts now seem to understand that powering a modern society will require something else in addition to intermittent electricity generation. The currently fashionable ’something else’ is storage. This paper will discuss storage technologies, Britain’s current facilities and what might be needed to provide reliable power from wind, solar and tidal generation. There seems to be no possibility that any existing storage technology can handle the intermittency of wind generation. Solar plus battery storage is probably already cost-competitive for locations in or near the tropics, where year-round load factors are acceptable and so only overnight storage is required. In the UK, low winter load factors mean that essentially no useful generation takes place in December and January.

06.Feb.2019 Written by

David Wojick, Heartland Institute, Ph.D. Philosophy of Science and Mathematical Logic, B.Sc. Civil Engineering: The brutal cold wave that just struck America provides a stark example of why 100% renewables cannot possibly work. Once the massive high pressure system was in place there was almost no wind, so no significant wind power. And the coldest temperatures by far were at night or early morning, when there was no solar power either. The first drawing shows Germany aiming for 100% wind and solar and they are using coal as backup, essentially no reduction in fossil fuel capacity. Colorado and California are mandating 100% wind and solar (with fossil fuel backup?). It is the worse possible energy plan for modern economies. Thank the politicians who planned this.

01.Feb.2019 Written by

Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and Chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd: This is a broad brush picture of the nuclear power situation here. South Africa is the only country in Africa which has a nuclear power station. It is ‘Koeberg’ and it is situated close to Cape Town. It has been running for over 30 years and is recognised as one of the best run nuclear power stations in the world. A number of previous Koeberg senior managers and staff (about 80) are currently at the Baraka nuclear plant in the UAE, in significant positions, bringing that nuclear power station online.

29.Jan.2019 Written by

Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow: The IPCC says it’s still possible to limit planetary warming to an additional 0.5 degrees C (0.9 F) “above pre-industrial levels” – but only if global CO2 emissions are halved by 2030 and zeroed out by 2050. So climate alarmists intend to carbon-tax, legislate and regulate our energy, factories, livelihoods, living standards, liberties and lives to the max. We went to war with King George over far less serious abuses and usurpations.

28.Jan.2019 Written by

Clinton Crackel, Co-Founder, Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing Coalition: Coal is a truly valuable natural resource for the production of gasoline, diesel fuel, jet fuel, synthetic gas, naphtha, coke for steel-making, water and electricity. Another valuable product that can be obtained from coal is carbon fiber. It is ideal for manufacturing components for aerospace applications, automotive manufacturing, water craft manufacturing, body armor and numerous other industrial and household products.

26.Jan.2019 Written by

Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and Chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd: This article explains how nuclear can use coal to create petrol for many transportation applications. Somewhat more than a third of South Africa’s petrol is derived from coal via the SASOL operation. When South Africa was developing its own SMR the PBMR, SASOL was interested in building a PBMR near one of the catalytic cracking plants to supply process heat. At present the largest SASOL plant is in a town called Secunda. It burns coal to provide the process heat to crack the rest of the coal. About 60% of the coal brought into Secunda is burnt to provide the heat to crack the other 40%. So the idea was to build the SMR of about 100MW and then to use its heat directly to chemically process 100% of the coal to liquid fuels, including diesel, aviation fuel and so on. This was projected to be able to reduce the cost of petrol significantly.

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