Today: 22.Oct.2018
21.Oct.2018 Written by

Rob Jeffrey, Economic Risk Consultant: “Although nuclear energy has a high capital cost, it has a large load factor that is about 90%, compared with other energy sources that have a much lower load factor and life capacity.” South Africa’s National Development Plan (NDP) set the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth target at more than 5% a year for the country to meet its economic, social and political objectives. These objectives include the three fundamental targets of reducing inequality, poverty and unemployment.

10.Oct.2018 Written by

Rob Jeffrey, Economic Risk Consultant, Poverty is the single highest social cost to society. There are only three major policy objectives: a) poverty alleviation, b) reducing inequality and c) reducing unemployment. Emerging economies require electricity energy sources that offer security of supply at the lowest possible cost. Conclusion: Unless emerging countries that have fossil fuels use them it will heavily prejudice their future growth and result in increased unemployment and poverty. Renewables and carbon tax are contrary to objectives. They are both taxes on the poor.

07.Oct.2018 Written by

Robert Bryce is author of “Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper,” and many other books and articles about energy. Coal is denser, contains more energy, and is easier to handle than wood. Oil takes up half as much space as coal and can be transported easily and cheaply by pipeline. Natural gas can be used for many of the same purposes as oil, including terrestrial transportation, power generation, and space heating, but is now cheaper than oil (on a Btu basis). Gas emits about half as much carbon dioxide as coal and creates far fewer air pollutants than either oil or coal. Electricity (which of course must be manufactured from coal, natural gas, oil, uranium or thorium) is extremely flexible, is easily transported via wires, and can be switched on or off with the flick of a switch. Using carbon-based fuels like coal, oil, and natural gas to create cleaner, more ordered forms of energy like electricity provides opportunities to use evermore sophisticated tools, with computers and lasers being prime examples of this trend.

28.Sep.2018 Written by

Bonne Posma, physicist, Chairman, Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd, Founder, Saminco (USA) specializing in electric propulsion systems for off-road vehicles and underground mining conveyances. Comments by John Droz, physicist, Jon Boone, wind energy expert, Eric Jelinski nuclear and wind energy expert: Newly elected leaders in South Africa are changing the energy plan now aiming to use massive amounts of wind and solar energy instead of additional nuclear power. South Africa is unique in the world in having outstanding experience with nuclear power and production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. it has some of the world's top experts in nuclear energy. This paper discusses the technical consequences of using wind and solar instead of nuclear. South Africa will squander the expertise they have that can help all of Africa. Political and business lobbying with elected officials will have terrible consequences, when elected officials don't care to understand the technologies they are deciding on.

19.Sep.2018 Written by

Jeff Johnson, Chemical & Engineering News: The U.S. appears to be witnessing the slow death of nuclear power. Plants are aging out and retiring, and their place in the electricity marketplace is being captured by cheaper, simpler, and less controversial sources—particularly natural gas plants and renewable energy sources such as wind and solar.

15.Sep.2018 Written by

Clinton Crackel, Co-Founder, Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing Coalition: According to the EIA, as of 2017 in the U.S., nuclear power on the utility scale has the highest average capacity factor (reliability, also stated as CF) of 92%, while geothermal is rated at 76.4% and coal is rated at 53.5%. The optimum CFs for wind, solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP) are 36.7%, 27% and 21.8%, respectively.

14.Sep.2018 Written by

Praveen Duddu: Eight of the 10 largest wind farms in the world are operated in the US, with five situated in Texas alone. Just one offshore wind farm has made to the list, while all others are onshore. Power-technology.com profiles the world's 10 largest wind farms based on installed capacity.

11.Sep.2018 Written by

Edgar Ocampo Tellez: • Decir que las fuentes renovables de energía son inagotables es falso: tienen limitantes técnicas, físicas, y problemas de intermitencia. • El aumento exponencial de consumo de energía es muy reciente. Surge después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. En los últimos ocho mil años la humanidad estuvo conformada por menos de 300 millones de habitantes, pero hoy somos siete mil millones. El potencial renovable de nuestro territorio es de 44 terawatts de energía hidráulica, 87 de eólica, 200 de solar y 52 de geotérmica; en total, 400 terawatts hora anuales; pero nos faltarían 600 más. “Ése es el predicamento en el que se encuentra el modelo energético mexicano, y no es de fácil solución”.

09.Sep.2018 Written by

Mark Mills, economics21.org: Not satisfied with the mere claim that solar and wind are reaching parity with the costs of conventional energy technologies, green enthusiasts are upping the ante claiming that by “2030, the cost [of solar] could be so near to zero it will effectively be free.” But no amount of research or torturing of reality, however, will lead to that result. Both physics and history offer instructive lessons. That scenario has played out in Germany and Britain, both far further down the green path, leading to radically higher electricity prices there — 200% to 300% higher than in America.

01.Sep.2018 Written by

IEA, International Energy Agency: This overview presents a short selection of data from the first release of the World Energy Prices database of the International Energy Agency (May 2018). This database includes annual energy prices data for more than 100 countries, for gasoline, diesel, electricity and other products. Energy prices are a significant part of our domestic expenditures, play an important role for industrial competitiveness and influence energy consumption patterns. End use prices paid by final consumers are affected by movements in commodity markets as well as policy decisions.

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  • Rob Jeffrey, Economic Risk Consultant: “Although nuclear…
  • Rob Jeffrey, Economic Risk Consultant, Poverty is…
  • Mohn Doss, Medical Physicist in Diagnostic Imaging:…
  • John Dunn, MD, JD: The United States…
  • Robert Bryce is author of “Smaller Faster…
  • Rob Jeffrey, Economic Risk Consultant: “Although nuclear…