Today: 21.Aug.2018
17.Aug.2018 Written by

Survey by John Shanahan, civil engineer, Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA, EFN-USA, website: efn-usa.org and John Droz, physicist, Alliance for Wise Energy Decisions, website: wiseenergy.org: This survey has ten questions about fossil fuels, man-made global warming, and nuclear energy. Understanding the roles of fossil fuels and nuclear and the debate about man-made global warming are essential to making a better world. It was sent only to the Board of Advisors for EFN-USA. There were 13 responses from members in Chile, France, India, New Zealand and the United States. While the number of responses is very small, they come from people, most of whom have lots of experience in these fields. The survey presents their answers and most importantly their comments - all anonymously. Finally, one respondent offered an additional comment, beyond the scope of the survey. We considered it very valuable and posted it on the last page of this report.

11.Aug.2018 Written by

Bloomberg, Naureen Malik: Natural gas surged to 60 times the going rate as howling blizzard conditions stoked demand for the furnace fuel across the U.S. Northeast. The gas squeeze underscores the lack of adequate pipeline capacity to haul enough gas from Appalachia and points farther afield to Northeast metropolises where households have been scrapping heating-oil tanks for gas-fired furnaces. As a result, gas in the region is the world’s priciest, commanding 14 times more than U.K. futures price and about nine times more than Asian imports of the liquefied version of the fuel.

09.Aug.2018 Written by

Institute for Energy Research: Coal-fired electricity generation is far cleaner today than ever before. The popular misconception that our air quality is getting worse is wrong, as shown by EPA’s air quality data. Modern coal plants, and those retrofitted with modern technologies to reduce pollution, are a success story and are currently providing 30 percent of our electricity.

08.Aug.2018 Written by

Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow: Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFÉ) standards were devised back in 1975, amid anxiety over the OPEC oil embargo and supposedly imminent depletion of the world’s oil supplies. But recall, barely 15 years after Edwin Drake drilled the first successful oil well in 1859, a Pennsylvania geologist was saying the United States would run out of oil by 1878. Steadily improving technology and geological acumen kept finding more oil. Then the horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing (fracking) revolution postponed the demise of oil and natural gas production for at least another century. The fuels that brought wealth, health, longevity, and modern industrialization, transportation, communication and civilization to billions will continue doing so.

27.Jul.2018 Written by

John Shanahan, civil engineer, Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA: Strong and lasting economies need fossil fuels and nuclear. Only if government is well intended and stable, will there be sound energy programs. We should not kid ourselves that stopping use of fossil fuels and nuclear power is good. Competitors like an energy weak USA. We can't let that happen. We must eliminate frivolous lawsuits that demand stopping use of fossil fuels and nuclear power, cap and trade or carbon sequestration. To do otherwise is playing into the hands of those who would like to destroy North America and Europe.

26.Jul.2018 Written by

Petr Beckmann, Professor of Electrical Engineering: This energy book is still the most concise comparison of health hazards across multiple electrical generating technologies of which I am aware. He makes clear that no technique for generating electricity is absolutely safe. Each has its risks. However some are much more dangerous to human safety and health than others. His energy book carefully makes comparisons and shows that our failure to use nuclear as the primary heat source for electrical power generation has sentenced many people to premature death. Nuclear power generation using U.S. technology is not only safer in some aspects, but in all significant aspects.

25.Jul.2018 Written by

Roger Letsch, unbesorgt.de: Das Projekt Desertec wurde 2009 voller Euphorie gestartet. Es sollte die Energieversorgung mit Solarstrom für Europa sichern helfen und dem Erzeugerland hohe Einnahmen sichern. Wie fast immer bei Energiewendeprojekten hat man auch hier versucht politische, öknonomische und Naturgesetze auszuhebeln. Und ist erwartungsgemäß gescheitert. Roger Letsch fasst den Iststand zusammen.

24.Jul.2018 Written by

Richard McPherson, LCDR, U.S. Navy (Retired), Represented United States at the IAEA Chernobyl accident assessment. Co-Founder of Global Humanitarian Resources, Inc. helping humanity under the nexus of agriculture, water and energy: In a new Middle East, largely secured by their own joint force, the U.S. could shift its Middle East relationship away from investing tax dollars in the Department of Defense for ships, aircraft, helicopters and military personnel to safeguard the oil flow out of those countries. Instead, our relationship could focus on private investment for long-term energy security for the world.

20.Jul.2018 Written by

World Nuclear Association: • Switzerland has five nuclear reactors generating up to 40% of its electricity. Two large new units were planned. • National votes have confirmed nuclear energy as an ongoing part of Switzerland's electricity mix. • In June 2011 parliament resolved not to replace any reactors, and hence to phase out nuclear power gradually, and this was confirmed in a 2017 referendum.

Energy policy 2011 on: The seven-member Federal Council decided to ignore a referendum that had supported new nuclear power only one month earlier and declared that the country's nuclear power plants would not be replaced. The proposal was also approved by the upper house, the 46-member Council of States, by 3:1, though subject to ongoing review of technology options which might allow new plants.

20.Jul.2018 Written by

World Nuclear Association: • Nuclear power capacity worldwide is increasing steadily, with about 50 reactors under construction. • Most reactors on order or planned are in the Asian region, though there are major plans for new units in Russia. • Significant further capacity is being created by plant upgrading. • Plant lifetime extension programs are maintaining capacity, particularly in the USA. There are about 450 nuclear power reactors operating in 30 countries plus Taiwan, with a combined capacity of over 390 GWe. In 2015 these provided about 11% of the world's electricity. About 50 power reactors are currently being constructed in 13 countries, notably China, India, UAE and Russia.

China has 936 GWe, India 215 GWe, the world more than 1,373 GWe of coal plant capacity. In the next half century, more nuclear power capacity will be retired without replacement than new capacity added except in Russia, China and maybe India. Countries with exemplary nuclear power programs like Switzerland have decided to discontinue use of nuclear power as their plants reach end of life. Energy experts are at a complete loss of what Switzerland will do.

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