Today: 24.Jun.2019
Several energy types
Several energy types (68)

Discusses most or all energy sources used today.

07.Mar.2019 Written by

Rob Jeffrey, Economic Risk Consultant: Poverty is the single highest social cost to society. There are only three major policy objectives: a) poverty alleviation, b) reducing inequality and c) reducing unemployment. Emerging economies require electricity energy sources that offer security of supply at the lowest possible cost. Conclusion: Unless emerging countries that have fossil fuels use them it will heavily prejudice their future growth and result in increased unemployment and poverty. Renewables and carbon tax are contrary to objectives. They are both taxes on the poor.

03.Mar.2019 Written by

Jerry Ellis, Chairman of the Saltbush Club, Rod Carnegie, former Managing Director, CEO and Chairman of CRA (Rio Tinto): It is essential that Australia rebalances economic imperatives against populist ideas regarding the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. A strong Australian economy is crucial to Australia’s welfare and will also make a valuable contribution to world prosperity. Australia produces a tiny proportion of the world’s carbon dioxide. Even total closure of our industry would have no detectable impact on carbon dioxide emissions or global climate. We urgently need new supplies of reliable energy from coal, gas, hydro or nuclear.

26.Jan.2019 Written by

Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and Chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd: This article explains how nuclear can use coal to create petrol for many transportation applications. Somewhat more than a third of South Africa’s petrol is derived from coal via the SASOL operation. When South Africa was developing its own SMR the PBMR, SASOL was interested in building a PBMR near one of the catalytic cracking plants to supply process heat. At present the largest SASOL plant is in a town called Secunda. It burns coal to provide the process heat to crack the rest of the coal. About 60% of the coal brought into Secunda is burnt to provide the heat to crack the other 40%. So the idea was to build the SMR of about 100MW and then to use its heat directly to chemically process 100% of the coal to liquid fuels, including diesel, aviation fuel and so on. This was projected to be able to reduce the cost of petrol significantly.

16.Jan.2019 Written by

Joshua Goldstein, emeritus professor of international relations and Staffan Qvist, Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, Uppsala University, Sweden: Their article claims that the world only has 30 years to completely stop using fossil fuels and completely implement nuclear for all uses that fossil fuels are now used. Purely imaginary.

16.Jan.2019 Written by

Stratek Technology Leadership Programme, G C T Mathibe, John Shanahan: The Stratek Technology Programme is dedicated to training young engineers for key management careers. G C T Mathibe's thesis addresses the issue of sound infrastructure management. Only in a few countries, notably France and Switzerland has infrastructure management been done exceedingly well, consistently for a long time. This is essential. Otherwise, all the beautiful new cities, transportation systems, etc. of the modern era will break down and won't work well. One problem is that elected politicians in many countries control the budget for infrastructure management. Politicians get many more votes for new bridges and highways than for maintenance of the same. Hence the big problem.

02.Jan.2019 Written by

John Shanahan, civil engineer: Fossil fuels are extremely important for modern living and nearly irreplaceable today for many functions. This is a short article with photos about fossil fuels, nuclear power and the topic of man-made global warming, man-made climate change, man-made sea level rise and claims that some humans can "reverse climate change."

02.Dec.2018 Written by

Roger Bezdek, President of Management Information Services, Inc. brought this Nuclear Energy Institute report to our attention: The federal government has spent hundreds of billions of dollars since WW II supporting energy technologies with large shares going to fossil fuels. Energy subsidies are drawing intense attention as policymakers grapple with a variety of incentives that are straining competitive electricity markets and driving baseload generation off the grid.

16.Nov.2018 Written by

Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow: On the global stage, despite Herculean efforts by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and activist groups to redefine ‘climate change’ and conjure up scary hobgoblins, the obsession over global warming, ‘green’ energy and the Paris climate treaty has hit the rocky shoals of reality. Despite well over $150 million spent by billionaires Tom Steyer, Michael Bloomberg, George Soros and multiple environmentalist groups, hard-green voter propositions were resoundingly defeated in the 2018 US elections.

31.Oct.2018 Written by

Michael Shellenberger, Founder - President of Environmental Progress: We are writing as scientists, scholars, and concerned citizens to warn you of a persistent anti-nuclear bias in the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on keeping global temperatures from rising 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial levels.

07.Oct.2018 Written by

Robert Bryce is author of “Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper,” and many other books and articles about energy. Coal is denser, contains more energy, and is easier to handle than wood. Oil takes up half as much space as coal and can be transported easily and cheaply by pipeline. Natural gas can be used for many of the same purposes as oil, including terrestrial transportation, power generation, and space heating, but is now cheaper than oil (on a Btu basis). Gas emits about half as much carbon dioxide as coal and creates far fewer air pollutants than either oil or coal. Electricity (which of course must be manufactured from coal, natural gas, oil, uranium or thorium) is extremely flexible, is easily transported via wires, and can be switched on or off with the flick of a switch. Using carbon-based fuels like coal, oil, and natural gas to create cleaner, more ordered forms of energy like electricity provides opportunities to use evermore sophisticated tools, with computers and lasers being prime examples of this trend.

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