Today: 17.Oct.2017

Cheryl Rofer, Nuclear Diner: Two South Carolina utilities are abandoning two unfinished nuclear reactors, half of the new reactors being built in the United States today. A decision on the other two will be made later this month. Congratulations for contributing to this failure to: 1) The contractors who cannot build nuclear plants on time and within budget. 2) The utilities that cannot contract or manage the building of nuclear plants. 3) The financiers who have botched their judgments of the projects. 4) Proponents of nuclear power. 5) Opponents of nuclear power. 6) The Department of Energy and its predecessors. 7) Congress and the White House.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Dan Yurman, with links to similar important articles by Cheryl Rofer and Mark Hibbs: There is a strong likelihood that future plans by U.S. electric utilities to build full size nuclear reactors are now being put on indefinite hold. The reasons are already well known. Record low prices for natural gas are likely to persist for decades. The regulatory barriers to building new natural gas plants are surmounted with ease compared to gaining approval for a new reactor. In the middle of this glum outlook comes Mark Hibbs, a world class expert on the nuclear energy field, who is currently associated with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. In a new report about whether the nuclear energy industry has a future, he offers a qualified “maybe.”

Published in Energy Tomorrow

James Conca, scientist in the field of earth and environmental sciences. Contributor to Forbes: China now has more wind and solar energy than the rest of the world - combined. But transmission bottlenecks, coal’s undue influence, and market set-up have prevented large amounts of renewable electricity from reaching the Chinese grid. Renewables are increasing faster than the infrastructure to support them. So it’s not surprising that China would keep building huge hydro plants as well as tripling their nuclear power over the next decade. The largest power plants are nearly all hydro dams and nuclear.

Published in Energy Today

José Maldifassi Pohlhammer, Ph.D., máster en Ingenieria Nuclear del Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), profesor de la Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez en Viña del Mar, Chile: If one looks at the last three decades of nuclear power reactors, the issue of overall plant standardization appears as one of the advantages shown by CANDU and French reactors. Recently South Korea has developed, in association with Combustion Engineering, the standardized third generation APR 1400, of which four identical units have been sold to UAE, and other three identical units are being built and one is operational in their own country. The second issue has to do with fuel reprocessing. A government-directed and controlled industrial policy should be established to reprocess stored radioactive fuel-waste, and to start employing mixed oxides in all power plants.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Newsletter Subscription

  • Latest
  • Popular
  • Michael Shellenberger, Environmental Progress: Since the Fukushima…
  • Clinton Crackel, Co-founder and Co-chairman Nuclear Fuels…
  • Clinton Crackel, Co-founder and Co-chairman Nuclear Fuels…
  • Walter Horsting, Principal Business Development International: The…
  • Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the…
  • Clinton Crackel, Co-founder and Co-chairman Nuclear Fuels…
  • Walter Horsting, Principal Business Development International: The…
  • Michael Shellenberger, Environmental Progress: Since the Fukushima…