Today: 25.Jul.2017

Sean Hackbarth, Senior Editor, Digital content, U.S. Chamber of Commerce: More than 2,300 coal fired power plants are planned or under construction worldwide. There is and will continue to be increasing world demand for electricity. A chart in this article shows from 1980 to 2012, world electricity production from coal increased by 192%. Forty percent of electricity is generated from coal. In India, with its middle class expected to grow to 200 million by 2020, Robert Bryce at the Manhattan Institute points out, “India’s coal use is expected to more than double by 2035."

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Hiroko Tabuchi, New York Times: China’s energy companies will make up nearly half of the new coal generation expected to go online in the next decade. Chinese corporations are building or planning to build more than 700 new coal plants at home and around the world, some in countries that today burn little or no coal. Over all, 1,600 coal plants are planned or under construction in 62 countries. The new plants would expand the world’s coal-fired power capacity by 43 percent. Of the world’s 20 biggest coal plant developers, 11 are Chinese.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Stephan Savarese, research engineer. President of Sauvons le Climat, Saving Our Planet: https://savingourplanet.net: Whatever the reasons for climate change, it's here and it's big. I name it Climate Transition because Climate Change has become a political issue. Showing pictures of isolated cold episodes in narrow regions of the world is picturesque, but cannot change the accurate, revised, precise statistics, which show that global warming has accelerated (at least) fourfold within the past fifty years, at a rate surprisingly fast and chaotic. As a consequence, ocean level rise, which had stabilized over the past five millennia at 1 mm/year, is on the verge of crossing the 5 mm/year mark, due to accelerated sea water thermal expansion, plus continental glacier melting.

Jean-Luc Salanave, Le développementfulgurantdes énergies solaire, photovoltaïque etéolienne,en ce débutde XXIe siècle, nous faitaussi expérimenter leurs inconvénients.La technologie en solutionnera bon nombre,mais intermittence etencombrementdemeurerontdes défauts majeurs de ces deux sources d’énergie tantqu’il y aura des absences de soleil ou de vent,etque 10 milliards de terriens auront besoin de surfaces habitables,cultivables etde forêts. Conclusion Pour satisfaire ses besoins énergétiques,l’homme ne disposera de rien d’autre que des trois seules forces fondamentales que la nature metà sa disposition :la force électromagnétique (énergies chimiques,combustibles fossiles,biomasse,photovoltaïque,…),la gravitation (énergies hydraulique,éolienne,inertielle,potentielle …) et les forces nucléaires (radioactivité,fission,fusion).

Published in Energy Tomorrow
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