Today: 24.Jun.2018

Edgar Ocampo Tellez: El propósito de este trabajo es el de realizar un acercamiento a las condiciones que serán necesarias construir durante las próximas décadas para que México logre alcanzar un modelo energético sostenible hacia el horizonte 2050. - The objective of this paper is to examine all energy sources for Mexico to have sustainable energy supplies by 2050. This primarily includes wind, solar, fossil fuels. There are no plans to replace their nuclear plants, in part because there are no companies in the USA or Europe to build them. So far, Mexico has not turned to Russia, China or South Korea to provide new nuclear plants.

Published in Several energy types

Vaclav Smil, Czech-Canadian scientist and policy analyst. Professor Emeritus in the Faculty of Environment at the University of Manitoba in Canada: The human craving for novelty is insatiable, and in a small matter you can meet it in no time at all, particularly when Moore’s Law can help you. It took a single decade to come up with entirely new mobile phones. But you just can’t replicate that pace of adoption with techniques that form the structure of modern civilization—growing food, extracting energy, producing bulk materials, or providing transport on mass scales.

Published in Several energy types

Nadine Freischlad, writer for Mongabay Series: In the early 2000s, Kirk Sorensen had begun trying to revive interest in an alternative type of reactor, one that uses the element thorium instead of uranium to start the nuclear reaction, and liquid fuel instead of solid rods to sustain it. He believes thorium could make the next generation of nuclear power plants safer and easier to manage, and provide the world with an abundance of clean, cheap and safe energy. Nuclear had been considered in Indonesia before, but plans never materialized due to safety concerns. After all, Indonesia is prone to earthquakes and tsunamis, a country of thousands of islands draped across the seismic Ring of Fire.

Published in Nuclear

Fritz Vahrenholt, PhD Chemistry, Chairman, German Wildlife Foundations: You have called the German energy transition a "disaster". How so? Fritz Vahrenholt : First of all, after the tsunami in Japan, the German government decided within a weekend to renounce nuclear energy, which until then had created the base load for German industry. Since then, the government wants to replace this secure energy with fluctuating electricity from sun and wind. Everyone knows that this is not sensible.

Published in Wind and Solar

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