Today: 25.May.2017

Ed Berry, Physicist and Patric Moore, Environmentalist: They both consider that CO2 from human emissions is not causing serious man-made global warming, serious other climate change effects, nor serious rise in ocean levels. In this discussion, they debate which view, logic, reasons are correct for the conclusion that they share about CO2 from human emissions.

Barry Brook, Faculty of Science, Engineering & Technology, U. of Tasmania, Australia & Staffan Qvist, Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, Uppsala University, Sweden: This documents the excellent French and Swedish nuclear power plant construction programs in the 1960s to 1990s. It then extrapolates to a prediction that the whole world could be on 100 % nuclear power within 25 - 34 years. This must assume that the rest of the world has similar government support and cooperation, similar stable, honest leadership, sound economies, industrial capabilities, education systems, etc. and that the construction companies and nuclear fuel demands for France and Sweden can be quickly increased to those of the whole world. It assumes that the world will use the same nuclear technology as the Swedish and French programs of the 1970s to 90s. In reality, it may take several hundred years to replace 50% of fossil fuels with advanced nuclear technologies that still need development and testing.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

John Shanahan, Dr. Ing., Civil Engineer: With financial and management situations of Toshiba, Westinghouse, Areva, and GE in the nuclear power business, the world's capability to build new nuclear power plants has obviously been set back. China, Russia and South Korea are now the leading sources of new nuclear power plants. How France and the United States might make a come back is not known at this time. This is a simple estimate of how long it might take to have nuclear become 50% of the world's electric generating capacity. The conclusion is that it will probably take several hundred years to get to 50% nuclear electric generating capacity. This has significant implications for energy planning.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Barack Obama, President of the United States: "Few challenges facing America and the world are more urgent than combating climate change. The science is beyond dispute and the facts are clear." "With all due respect Mr. President, that is not true." We, the undersigned scientists, maintain that the case for alarm regarding climate change is grossly overstated.

  • Latest
  • Popular
  • Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and…
  • Reuters, Tom Hals, Emily Flitter: In 2012,…
  • Sidney Bernsen, Ph.D., Former Chief Nuclear Engineer…
  • Barry Brook, Faculty of Science, Engineering &…
  • Jay Lehr, Ph.D. Science Director at The…