Today: 20.Aug.2019

The world is full of scientists, medical professionals and engineers who have made tremendous contributions to making the world a lot better AND explaining it to the public in an interesting way. Alan Waltar is one such person. Please take time to read each of the slides in this presentation. There is a lot we can learn.

The first nuclear medicine facilities appeared in the mid-1970s and early 1980s in South America, primarily in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile, the economic leaders of the Southern Cone. Today there are over 750 nuclear medicine specialists scattered through the region, including 300 in Argentina and 260 in Brazil.

A total of 13.1 million in vitro radioassays were carried out yearly. It was proved that the content of nuclear medicine practice in Japan has changed considerablys. Namely, 18F-FDG-PET and radionuclide therapy increased.

Darrell Fisher presents an excellent overview of medical isotopes, their various methods of production and use in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Today, nuclear medicine is practised in over 100 countries around the world. Tremendous progress has been made in being able to "see" diseases and treat them.

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