Today: 11.Dec.2018

S. Fred Singer, Ph.D. in physics is an atmospheric and space physicist. What is the impact of a warmer climate? It's not the warming itself that we should be concerned about. It is the impact. So we have to then ask: What is the impact on agriculture? The answer is: It's positive. It's good. What's the impact on forests of greater levels of CO2 and greater temperatures? It's good. What is the impact on water supplies? It's neutral. What is the impact on sea level? It will produce a reduction in sea-level rise. It will not raise sea levels. What is the impact on recreation? It's mixed. You get, on the one hand, perhaps less skiing; on the other hand, you get more sunshine and maybe better beach weather. Let's face it. People like warmer climates. There's a good reason why much of the U.S. population is moving into the Sun Belt, and not just people who are retiring.

Survey by John Shanahan, civil engineer, Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA, EFN-USA, website: efn-usa.org and John Droz, physicist, Alliance for Wise Energy Decisions, website: wiseenergy.org: This survey has ten questions about fossil fuels, man-made global warming, and nuclear energy. Understanding the roles of fossil fuels and nuclear and the debate about man-made global warming are essential to making a better world. It was sent only to the Board of Advisors for EFN-USA. There were 13 responses from members in Chile, France, India, New Zealand and the United States. While the number of responses is very small, they come from people, most of whom have lots of experience in these fields. The survey presents their answers and most importantly their comments - all anonymously. Finally, one respondent offered an additional comment, beyond the scope of the survey. We considered it very valuable and posted it on the last page of this report.

Published in Several energy types

Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow, Pope Francis: We must “enter into dialogue with all people about our common home,” Pope Francis recently told the US Congress, frequently quoting from his Laudato Si encyclical. “We need a conversation which includes everyone, since the environmental challenge … and its human roots concern and affect us all.” I couldn’t agree more. Unfortunately, the pontiff seems more interested in a lecture than a conversation on climate change. The pope’s advisors believe humans are destroying our planet and dangerously changing its climate. This website shows over a thousand photos of how beautiful the world is today with snow falling from the Equator to the Poles. How much more snow do climate alarmists need in order that they will permit the world to continue using fossil fuels?

William Happer, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Steven Koonin, New York University, Center for Urban Science and Progress, Under Secretary for Science at U.S. Depart. of Energy in President Obama's administration, Richard Lindzen Emeritus Professor, MIT Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences: This is a tutorial on man-made global warming, man-made climate change for the U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, San Francisco Division. 1) The climate is always changing. 2) Human influences on the climate are a small (1%) perturbation to natural energy flows. 3) It is not possible to tell how much of the modest recent warming can be ascribed to human influences. 4) There have been no detrimental changes observed in the most salient climate variables and today's projections of future changes are highly uncertain.

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