Today: 21.Aug.2018

Axios, Zachary Basu: If China achieves the targets outlined in its Energy Development Strategy Action Plan, it will become the world's nuclear energy leader and fundamentally change the global trajectory of the nuclear power industry.

Published in Uranium fueled

Nikkei Asian News, Tomoyo Ogawa: Russia accounts for 67% of the world's nuclear plant deals currently in development. By 2030, Rosatom aims to increase its overseas sales to two-thirds of total sales, from 50% currently. Russia is looking to expand its influence through nuclear diplomacy, vying with China for the status of nuclear energy superpower. China is adding nuclear power as fast as possible and will compete globally in the future. The United States is under the thumb of anti-nuclear organizations and go along media and elected officials. California wants to employ mostly wind and solar power. Richard McPherson, member of the Board of Advisors for EFN-USA reported this story.

Published in Uranium fueled

Madison Freeman, www.defenseone.com, Council of Foreign Relations: Russia and China are using nuclear power projects to build spheres of energy dependence, and the United States is unprepared to respond. The Akkuyu reactor shows how Russia — and now China — are using energy exports to build influence abroad. Russia bids for such projects through its state-owned nuclear company, Rosatom, under a model that finances construction of nuclear plants, furnishes the trained personnel to run them, and leases them back to the client country. These projects come with more than a monetary price tag. Meanwhile, U.S. nuclear companies find it nearly impossible to compete against government-backed competitors motivated by political goals more than profit.

Published in Nuclear

Dennis Normile, writer for www.sciencemag.org, website for AAAS, American association for the Advancement of Science: Most of the world is turning its back on burning coal to produce electricity, but not Japan. The nation has fired up at least eight new coal power plants in the past 2 years and has plans for an additional 36 over the next decade—the biggest planned coal power expansion in any developed nation (not including China and India).

Published in Fossil fuels