Today: 25.Jun.2017

Jerry Cuttler, Ph.D. Nuclear Sciences and Engineering, past president of Canadian Nuclear Society. Ludwig Feinendegen, MD, Professor Emeritus, Heinrich-Heine Universität, Director of the Institute of Medicine at Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich. Yehoshua Socol Ph.D. Experimental High-Energy Physics, Executive Analyst, Falcon Analytics: After the 1956 radiation scare to stop weapons testing, studies focused on cancer induction by low-level radiation. Concern has shifted to protecting “radiation-sensitive individuals.” Since longevity is a measure of health impact, this analysis reexamined data to compare the effect of dose rate on the lifespans of short-lived (5% and 10% mortality) dogs and on the lifespans of dogs at 50% mortality. .. .. If dogs model humans, this evidence would support a change to radiation protection policy. Maintaining exposures “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) appears questionable.

Published in Radiation

Jerry Cuttler: Although almost 120 years of medical experience and data exist on human exposure to ionizing radiation, advisory bodies and regulators claim there are still significant uncertainties about radiation health risks that require extreme precautions be taken. In the `950s, without scientific evidence, the Natitonal Academy of Sciences Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR) Committee recommended that the linear no-threshold (LNT) model be used to assess the risk of radiation-induced mutations in germ cells and the risk of cancer in somatic cells.

Published in Radiation

Jerry Cuttler, James Welsh - A world-wide radiation health scare was created in the late 1950s to stop the testing of atomic bombs and block the development of nuclear energy. In spite of the large amount of evidence that contradicts the cancer predictions, this fear continues. It impairs the use of low radiation doses in medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy. No predictions of excess cancer risk should be made for an acute exposure below 50 rem, or 0.5 Sv until there is scientific evidence to support the LNT hypothesis.

Published in Radiation

Jerry Cuttler, a leading nuclear scientist, summaries research from around the world and shows that the beneficial radiation effects contradict the Linear No-Threshold Hypothesis cancer predictions.

Published in Radiation