Today: 26.Jul.2017

European Association of Nuclear Medicine: New nuclear imaging techniques help to detect a key factor involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) much earlier and more precisely than before. Recently developed tracers, used with positron emission tomography (PET) make tau tangles in the brain visible.

Published in Radioisotopes

European Association of Nuclear Medicine: For tumor patients the timely choice of the appropriate therapy is of vital importance.Nuclear medical methods such as PET (positron emission tomography) allow not only for targeting the tumor but also for assessing the treatment outcome soon after therapy onset. This enables doctors to change treatment if necessary and adapt it to the specific conditions and needs of their patients. A non-responder patient can be identified very soon after therapy onset so that non-effective chemotherapy can be immediately stopped, reducing adverse side effects through inefficient toxicity and enabling an early salvage approach, for example by shifting to a different drug or to radiotherapy.

Published in Radioisotopes

Jeremy Li, IAEA: Radiopharmaceuticals are a key component of nuclear medicine, and are crucial to fighting cancer and several other medical conditions. Their use, however, requires extensive personnel training on patient safety and equipment handling. Thanks to a recent IAEA training course, radiopharmacists from across Africa have acquired new skills and knowledge in this area and have since shared what they learned with their co-workers back home.

Published in Radioisotopes

Dale Bailey - Review of last 30 years in nuclear medicine in Australia and projections for the future.

Published in Radioisotopes