Today: 18.Aug.2017

David Cherry and Ramasimong Phillip Tsokolibane: South African President Jacob Zuma and his cabinet are now determined to build new nuclear power plants to generate an additional 9600 megawatts (9.6 gigawatts) of electric power. South Africa currently has the only nuclear power plant on the African continent—at Koeberg, 20 miles north of Cape Town—which provides 1800 MW, or about 5% of the country’s power. It was commissioned in 1984. The decision to build more nuclear power plants is historic, both for South Africa and Africa as a whole, because nuclear power is the indispensable successor to fossil fuels. It is no coincidence that it comes at the moment of the founding of the New Development Bank by the BRICS nations—Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. (All of the BRICS nations have nuclear power, and all are building more.)

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Dr Kelvin Kemm is the CEO of Nuclear Africa, a nuclear project management company based in Pretoria, South Africa. He is a member of the International Board of Advisors of CFACT, Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow. He also serves on the Board of Advisors for Go Nuclear, Inc. and Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA. Dr. Kemm received the prestigious Lifetime Achievers Award of the National Science and Technology Forum of South Africa. He is dedicated to bringing nuclear energy to all of Africa, to a balanced understanding of the benefits of fossil fuels and their many by-products, and having a sound scientific discussion about claims of man-made global warming from use of fossil fuels.

Francois Mellet, Electrical Engineer: Uranium in nature is a slightly radioactive metal that occurs throughout the Earth’s crust. It occurs in most rocks, in concentrations of 2 to 4 parts per million. Uranium is about 500 times more abundant than gold. It is also naturally present in most soils, as well as in many rivers and in sea water. The earth’s Uranium (chemical symbol U) was apparently formed in supernovae up to about 6.6 billion years ago. Its radioactive decay provides the main source of heat inside the earth, causing convection of molten rock and consequent continental drift.

Published in Energy Today

Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation: South Africa is getting ready to buiild three new nuclear power plants. Koeberg nuclear power plant was built on time and within budget, 40 years ago. There is no reason why South Africa cannot do it again. We have far superior skills and technology now than we had then. Anti-nuclear activists want wind and solar instead.

Published in Energy Today