Today: 22.Aug.2017

European Association of Nuclear Medicine: Prostate cancer patients who are resistant to hormone treatment used to have a poor prognosis. Until recently, the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities had been limited, but now innovative developments in nuclear medicine imaging and therapy open up promising pathways. Novel substances used with PET/CT (positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography) not only allow for better diagnosis but also offer treatment options where other therapies have failed.

Published in Radioisotopes

European Association of Nuclear Medicine: For tumor patients the timely choice of the appropriate therapy is of vital importance.Nuclear medical methods such as PET (positron emission tomography) allow not only for targeting the tumor but also for assessing the treatment outcome soon after therapy onset. This enables doctors to change treatment if necessary and adapt it to the specific conditions and needs of their patients. A non-responder patient can be identified very soon after therapy onset so that non-effective chemotherapy can be immediately stopped, reducing adverse side effects through inefficient toxicity and enabling an early salvage approach, for example by shifting to a different drug or to radiotherapy.

Published in Radioisotopes

European Association of Nuclear Medicine: At an advanced stage prostate cancer frequently leads to bone metastases which may result in pain, fractures, and disability and are associated with a poor prognosis. Recently a major breakthrough has been achieved which is about to improve the patients’ situation, as Prof. Markus Luster, expert of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), points out: “Radium-223- dichloride is the first bone-targeted drug that not only alleviates symptoms but also prolongs the life expectancy of these patients.

Published in Radioisotopes

Timothy J. Jorgensen, Director of the Health Physics and Radiation Protection Graduate Program and Associate Professor of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University - You might guess that a frequent flyer’s radiation dose is coming from the airport security checkpoints, with their whole-body scanners and baggage x-ray machines, but you’d be wrong. The radiation doses to passengers from these security procedures are trivial. The major source of radiation exposure from air travel comes from the flight itself. Most people do not fly 370,000 miles (equal to 150 flights from Los Angeles to New York) within their lifetimes. So for the average flyer, the increased risk is far less than 0.01 percent.

Published in Radiation