Today: 10.Dec.2018

S. Fred Singer, Ph.D. in physics is an atmospheric and space physicist. What is the impact of a warmer climate? It's not the warming itself that we should be concerned about. It is the impact. So we have to then ask: What is the impact on agriculture? The answer is: It's positive. It's good. What's the impact on forests of greater levels of CO2 and greater temperatures? It's good. What is the impact on water supplies? It's neutral. What is the impact on sea level? It will produce a reduction in sea-level rise. It will not raise sea levels. What is the impact on recreation? It's mixed. You get, on the one hand, perhaps less skiing; on the other hand, you get more sunshine and maybe better beach weather. Let's face it. People like warmer climates. There's a good reason why much of the U.S. population is moving into the Sun Belt, and not just people who are retiring.

Armstrong Economics: Real data showing extreme heat and drought in the Czech Republic and Germany going back 900 years. The heat and drought in Europe in 2018 is most likely natural. The massive, expensive climate change alarmist computer models can't reproduce this natural process, but claim with their expertise in science that they can predict that humans are causing catastrophic climate change far into the future. Read the messages on the Hunger Stones in the Elbe River.

Sebastian Luening, paleogeologist: In the Baltic Sea region, there have been demonstrable major climatic fluctuations over the last 1000 years. Warm and colder periods alternated, with major consequences for the lives of plants, animals and humans. During the "medieval warm period" between 950 and 1250 AD, the northern hemisphere, including the Baltic Sea region, had higher-than-average temperatures compared to the periods before and after. The summer of 2018 experienced warmer than normal temperatures in the Baltic region, making it difficult for those used to air conditioning in the United States to sleep without this convenience after a day of bicycling in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Is this due to man's use of fossil fuels? This paleogeologist shows similar warm periods over the last 1000 years.

Survey by John Shanahan, civil engineer, Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA, EFN-USA, website: efn-usa.org and John Droz, physicist, Alliance for Wise Energy Decisions, website: wiseenergy.org: This survey has ten questions about fossil fuels, man-made global warming, and nuclear energy. Understanding the roles of fossil fuels and nuclear and the debate about man-made global warming are essential to making a better world. It was sent only to the Board of Advisors for EFN-USA. There were 13 responses from members in Chile, France, India, New Zealand and the United States. While the number of responses is very small, they come from people, most of whom have lots of experience in these fields. The survey presents their answers and most importantly their comments - all anonymously. Finally, one respondent offered an additional comment, beyond the scope of the survey. We considered it very valuable and posted it on the last page of this report.

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