Today: 18.Aug.2017

John Kotek, Vice President of the Nuclear Energy Institute,, Warren Miller, affiliated with Texas A&M and Stanford University, Peter Lyons led the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy from 2010-2015: First, we must ensure significant domestic nuclear energy production. Second, our private nuclear energy sector must compete and win in the international marketplace. The export of a broad range of civil nuclear technologies ensures U.S. influence to protect against misuse. Third, we must be an early, and active, partner to the many countries with no previous nuclear experience that want nuclear energy. It is critical that these countries select proven technologies that are appropriately regulated and operated. And finally, the U.S. must continue to lead in nuclear energy innovation.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

John Shanahan, Dr. Ing., Civil Engineer: With financial and management situations of Toshiba, Westinghouse, Areva, and GE in the nuclear power business, the world's capability to build new nuclear power plants has obviously been set back. China, Russia and South Korea are now the leading sources of new nuclear power plants. How France and the United States might make a come back is not known at this time. This is a simple estimate of how long it might take to have nuclear become 50% of the world's electric generating capacity. The conclusion is that it will probably take several hundred years to get to 50% nuclear electric generating capacity. This has significant implications for energy planning.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Rod Adams, Atomic energy expert with small nuclear plant operating and design experience. Financial, strategic, and political analyst. It’s time to move from repeated bipartisan efforts to permanently kill the FFTF, Fast Flux Test Facility, to a broad-based effort to recognize value and restore the facility that our parents built and carefully put away in case we might need it.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Gary Young, mechanical engineer, major product development manager - Before retirement, he worked on product development that significantly contributed to profitability of a global technology company. In this three part series of articles titled "A Galactic Visitor's Essay," he uses a fictional galactic visitor to let his outstanding technical knowledge and practical experience describe important new ways to use existing nuclear power that can solve many problems existing today in nuclear power and energy needs in general. Part III is the presentation of his grand idea, starting in the United States.

Published in Energy Tomorrow