Today: 18.Aug.2017

John Kotek, Vice President of the Nuclear Energy Institute,, Warren Miller, affiliated with Texas A&M and Stanford University, Peter Lyons led the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy from 2010-2015: First, we must ensure significant domestic nuclear energy production. Second, our private nuclear energy sector must compete and win in the international marketplace. The export of a broad range of civil nuclear technologies ensures U.S. influence to protect against misuse. Third, we must be an early, and active, partner to the many countries with no previous nuclear experience that want nuclear energy. It is critical that these countries select proven technologies that are appropriately regulated and operated. And finally, the U.S. must continue to lead in nuclear energy innovation.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Steven Mufson, Washington Post: The long quest to revive America’s nuclear power industry suffered a crippling setback when two South Carolina utilities halted construction on a pair of reactors that were once expected to showcase a modern design for a new age of nuclear power built at the V.C. Summer Nuclear Station. The project has been plagued by billions of dollars of cost overuns, stagnant demand for electricity, competition from cheap natural gas plants ... ..., and the bankruptcy of Westinghouse Electric, the lead contractor and the designer of the AP1000 reactor that was supposed to be the foundation of a smarter, cheaper generation of nuclear power plants.

Published in Energy Today

Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and Chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nuclear Africa: With his leadership and the in depth backing by many outstanding scientists, engineers, government leaders and industry managers, South Africa is working to bring advanced nuclear energy and radioisotope production to the region. Please see the 2017 Nuclear Africa Magazine below.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Reuters, Tom Hals, Emily Flitter: In 2012, construction of a Georgia nuclear power plant stalled for eight months as engineers waited for the right signatures and paperwork needed to ship a section of the plant from a factory hundreds of miles away. The approach - building prefabricated sections of the plants before sending them to the construction sites for assembly - was supposed to revolutionize the industry by making it cheaper and safer to build nuclear plants. But Westinghouse miscalculated the time it would take, and the possible pitfalls involved, in rolling out its innovative AP1000 nuclear plants, according to a close examination by Reuters of the projects. The miscalculations underscore the difficulties facing a global industry that aims to build about 160 reactors and is expected to generate around $740 billion in sales of equipment in services in the coming decade, according to nuclear industry trade groups.

Published in Energy Today