Today: 18.Jul.2019

Poul Hoilund-Carlsen, Department of Nuclear Medicine Odense University Hospital, Denmark, Mohn Doss, Medical Physicist in Diagnostic Imaging: “The good rays - let them shine” appeared in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine highlighting the invalidity of the LNT model and asking for relaxation of restrictions for low doses involved in nuclear medicine. The two major journals in nuclear medicine – Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) and EJNM are editorially aligned against the LNT model.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Howard Cork Hayden, Emeritus Physics Professor, University of Connecticut: Cancer is largely a failure of the immune system. Cells of the body are continuously being damaged and repaired, but suppressing the immune system increases the likelihood of cancer. Low doses of radiation evidently stimulate the immune system, with the result that there is a real hormesis effect. Any dose below about 100 mGy (10,000 mrads) can be considered safe. Normally, we would post just excerpts from this publication. Since the LNT article is a major part of this issue, we post the whole newsletter this one time.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Nicholas Dainiak, Ludwig Feinendegen, Randall Hyer, Paul Locke, Alan Waltar: Today is the time for acknowledgement of new models for biological response to low dose and low dose rate radiation on biological processes and human disease. The new deadline for submitting Abstracts is March 1, 2018. Submit Abstract at this website: http://www.lowdoserad.org/ For additional information contact Dr. Alan Waltar, conference chair at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or Dr. Tony Brooks, technical program co-chair at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Bruno Comby, Président de l'Association des écologistes pour le nucléaire (AEPN): Ramsar est une petite ville à proximité de la mer Caspienne, dans le Nord de l'Iran. Ramsar est donc, comme nous le voyons, un haut-lieu de l'écologie internationale et de la protection environnementale, avant même qu'il soit question de sa radioactivité ! Mais elle est célèbre (ou devrait l'être) aussi parce qu'on y trouve les plus forts taux de radioactivité naturelle qui aient jamais été mesurés. Quel meilleur endroit pour informer les populations sur la radioactivité naturelle que le lieu le plus radioactif connu sur notre planète ?

Published in Low Dose Radiation