Today: 15.Dec.2018

John Dunn, MD, JD: The United States Environmental Protection Agency is charged with identifying and mitigating environmental risks. This article discusses US EPA’s misguided decision to use the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) cancer risk model as a basis for regulating exposure of the public to ionizing radiation such as is associated with residential radon. The Health Physics Society has stated that reliance on the LNT model “…tends to foment the public’s fear of all types of radiation . . . reliance on the LNT model, especially at very low doses and dose rates, is inappropriate and can exaggerate the risk.” The HPS also condemns “collective” (cumulative) dose as a measure of radiation health risk.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

John Cardarelli II, Captain US Public Health Service Officer, Cincinnati, OH, USA, Brant Ulsh, M. H. Chew & Associates, Livermore, CA, USA: The USEPA uses the linear no-threshold (LNT) model to estimate cancer risks and determine cleanup levels in radiologically contaminated environments. The LNT model implies that there is no safe dose of ionizing radiation; however, adverse effects from low dose, low-dose rate (LDDR) exposures are not detectable.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Neil Alexander, Ph.D. radiation damage in steels, business strategist, consultant and advocate for nuclear energy: Eating is a risk, but not eating is a greater one. Let us remember that many other things that are not radioactive can also initiate cancer. Bacon for example. And for all we know that works on a LNT basis. That next rasher may literally be the death of you, or that cup of coffee. And don’t get me on the subject of beer, wine or anything else with alcohol in it.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Ludwig Feinendegen, M.D., former director of the Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Germany, 2010 Marie Curie Prize - Jerry Cuttler, D.Sc. in nuclear sciences and engineering, recipient of 2011 International Dose-Response Society Award for Outstanding Career Achievement: This is a summary statement about low dose radiation from all the articles by these scientist posted on efn-usa.org. "By far, the dominant risk of cancer is from the oxidation effects of oxygen we breath, not low dose radiation."

Published in Low Dose Radiation