Today: 15.Dec.2017

John Shanahan, Dr. Ing., Civil Engineer, President of Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA: The website: efn-usa.org presents over 1,000 articles, PowerPoint Presentations and videos by more than 600 authors from around the world. This article outlines the high level questions we focus on and our efforts to present different points of view, mainly so that what ends up being the better or right viewpoint is not omitted from the beginning. This applies to nuclear in relation to other energy sources, debates about other energy sources, dealing with public fear of nuclear and understanding low dose radiation.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Howard Cork Hayden, Emeritus Physics Professor, University of Connecticut: The most common question people bring up with respect to nuclear power is, “What do you do with the waste?” The answer requires discussion of three broad topics: the nature of uranium fission, radiation shielding, and the relationship between radiation and health. The first section is about the nature and the quantity of the high-level radioactive byproducts of uranium fission. This so-called “waste” from a nuclear reactor is different from the waste from burning coal. The second section discusses the nature of shielding and its effectiveness. The third section presents a simple mathematical proof that there is nothing inherently additive about radiation exposure.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Mythri Shankar, M.D.: Dr. Mythri Shankar has trained extensively in Nuclear Medicine from various globally renowned institutions such as UCLA, Cedars Sinai, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, and Harvard Medical School. She is a member of several international organizations such as the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (USA & India). She is a member of the International Board of Advisors for Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA, website: efn-usa.org.

Published in India

IAEA, International Energy Agency, Jeremy Li: As the major research reactors that supply Mo-99 age and cease production, the alternative method discussed in the paper offers a simplified way to diversify production and help ensure continued supplies of Mo-99 so that nuclear medicine services are not interrupted. In 2009, reactors producing Mo-99 in Canada and the Netherlands were temporarily shut down for necessary repairs and maintenance. This caused major disruption in health care services worldwide, leading to cancelled medical scans and postponed operations, and in some cases requiring medical professionals to revert back to using old, less effective techniques.