Today: 21.Jan.2018

Cameron Petrie, archaeologist: With climate change in our own era becoming increasingly evident, it’s natural to wonder how our ancestors may have dealt with similar environmental circumstances. New research methods and technologies are able to shed light on climate patterns that took place thousands of years ago, giving us a new perspective on how cultures of the time coped with variable and changing environments. An article in Current Anthropology explores the dynamics of adaptation and resilience in the face of a diverse and varied environmental context, using the case study of South Asia’s Indus Civilization (c.3000-1300 BC).

Bloomberg, John Trozi: Deaths from pollution exceeds many other cases including high-sodium diet, obesity, alcohol, road accidents, and malnutrition. Nine million annual deaths and a economic damage of trillions of dollars.

Published in Pollution

Steven Lyazi, student and worker in Kampala, Uganda: Malaria is no longer a killer in western countries – because they used DDT to help eradicate the disease decades ago. If wealthy nations and NGOs really want to help developing nations, they should support fossil fuel power plants for reliable, affordable electricity. They should support DDT as an important part of the solution to eradicate this serial killer, so that Africans can work, spend less on malaria, have more money for other healthcare and family needs, and develop as much as rich nations have.

Published in Uganda

Nicole Jawerth with the International Atomic Energy Agency explains how nuclear technology with neutron probes can significantly help manage scarce water and improve crops for countries like Sudan. This is a tremendous help for women farmers.