Today: 15.Nov.2018

Tauren Dyson, writer for UPI: A century ago, only 15 per cent of the Earth's surface was used by humans to grow crops and raise livestock," James Watson, a professor at University of Queensland's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said. "Between 1993 and 2009, an area of terrestrial wilderness larger than India -- a staggering 3.3 million square kilometers -- was lost to human settlement, farming, mining and other pressures."

John Shanahan, President of Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA: Plentiful, reliable, safe, environmentally sound energy is essential for the modern world. So are water supply and waste water treatment, food supply, sound economies, well run governments, good education systems, and peaceful relations with one another and between countries. How do we achieve these conditions? Should we go back to the way things were long ago or work to find good solutions using everything available today? This article focuses on one aspect of food production, mono-culture, large scale farming.

Published in Agriculture

Edward O. Wilson: One of the greatest biologists since Charles Darwin discusses his plan to save the biodiversity of Earth, and include everyone in the effort. In a career that spans six-plus decades (and ongoing) Wilson aided in developing the concept of biodiversity, biophilia, and uncovered – along with partner Robert McArthur – the theory of island biogeography, all of which overturned how conservationists, ecologists and, yes even, world leaders looked at the natural world.

John Shanahan asks, "What would the world be like if we didn't have plentiful energy for the seven plus billion people?" After a period of time, the world might revert back to what is shown in this video. What do you think?