Today: 20.Sep.2018
John Shanahan

John Shanahan

Jeff Johnson, Chemical & Engineering News: The U.S. appears to be witnessing the slow death of nuclear power. Plants are aging out and retiring, and their place in the electricity marketplace is being captured by cheaper, simpler, and less controversial sources—particularly natural gas plants and renewable energy sources such as wind and solar.

Senator Lisa Murkowski, Alaska: As our nuclear leadership declines, we are simultaneously losing our ability to influence security and nonproliferation decisions. Taking our place — but not always sharing our views — are countries that could put world security interests at risk. After inventing commercial nuclear power, the U.S. has now clearly fallen behind. Yet we can still turn the tide and restore our influence, particularly if we pursue the development of advanced reactors.

Sebastian Luening, paleogeologist: In der Klimawandeldiskussion wird oft die bereits stattfindende Zunahme der Klimavariabilität unterstellt: „Das Klima wird verrückter.“ Ständig versorgen uns Medien mit neuen Rekorden, Versicherungen mit explodierenden Schadenskurven, im Jahresabstand folgen 100-jährige Extremereignisse. Es folgt eine rationale Annäherung an die Frage, ob das Klima gegenüber früher generell extremer geworden ist und ob das die Folge des anthropogen verstärkten Treibhauseffekts ist.

Many scientists, engineers, professionals in many fields, members of the general public, the Governor of California, the Chancellor of Germany, and the Pope, "know" that mankind through their use of fossil fuels is causing catastrophic global warming, climate change, climate disruption and sea level rise. They demand that the poorer half of the world never use fossil fuels and the richer half stop using them. That would be an anthropogenic catastrophe. A scientific organization in Austria, ZAMG, reports that the climate variability in Austria for the last 200 years is the same or less than for the long term average. So mankind is innocent.

Clinton Crackel, Co-Founder, Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing Coalition: According to the EIA, as of 2017 in the U.S., nuclear power on the utility scale has the highest average capacity factor (reliability, also stated as CF) of 92%, while geothermal is rated at 76.4% and coal is rated at 53.5%. The optimum CFs for wind, solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP) are 36.7%, 27% and 21.8%, respectively.