Today: 19.Jan.2019
John Shanahan

John Shanahan

Howard Cork Hayden is Professor Emeritus of Physics at the University of Connecticut. His interests include science education without political agendas, atmospheric and climate science, energy for society (fossil fuels, nuclear, hydro, wind, biomass, photovoltaics, and solar heating). In this article he explains basic laws of physics about measuring heat stored in the oceans. This is not what the media and organizations with political agendas are describing

The topic of catastrophic man-made climate change has been around for decades. In the 1970s, John Holdren introduced the idea of a new ice age caused by human activity. Since the 1980s, he has talked about catastrophic man-made global warming caused by CO2 from use of fossil fuels. In 2015, he issued a "Climate Change Compendium" that is posted on this website. Use the SEARCH Box with keyword "HOLDREN." This response to Holdren's 2015 presentation is by Dr. Donald Rapp, a highly educated and experienced scientist. Rapp is open to the possibility of some local and global warming from use of fossil fuels and mankind's activities. He provides detailed comments to Holdren's predictions of catastrophic man-made global warming. Many scientists agree with Dr. Rapp.

Harrison Schmitt. The scientific rationale behind the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed massive intrusion into American life in the name of fighting climate change has no scientific or constitutional justification. This has no basis in observational science as has been discussed previously relative to climate history, temperature, and carbon dioxide.

In addition, oceans of the Earth play the dominant role in the perpetuation and mediation of naturally induced change of global climate.

Steven Koonin. The idea that "Climate science is settled" runs through today's popular and policy discussions. Unfortunately, that claim is misguided. It has not only distorted our public and policy debates on issues related to energy, greenhouse-gas emissions and the environment. But it also has inhibited the scientific and policy discussions that we need to have about our climate future.