Today: 25.Jun.2017
John Shanahan

John Shanahan

Paul Driessen, Senior Policy Advisor for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow: This recaps testimony by four scientist witnesses at the recent House Science Committee hearings on assumptions, policy implications and scientific principles of climate change. Junk science is being used to justify demands that the United States and world eliminate the carbon-based fuels that provide 80% of the energy that makes modern industry, civilization and living standards possible – and that are needed to lift billions more people out of poverty and disease.

Terry Gross, NPR, David Owen, New Yorker: We're going to start this interview with the subject of David Owen's new book, "Where The Water Goes," about the Colorado River. The river and its tributaries supply water to over 36 million people in seven states - Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona and California - and irrigates close to 6 million acres of farmland. Owen writes about the engineering feats that make all that possible and the legal and environmental battles surrounding the river. The Colorado River is so overtaxed that by the time it reaches the U.S.-Mexico border it's dry. This question can be repeated for rivers and ground water around the world. Each river that is overused destroys the land and water ecology. There are solutions, if we look far enough.

Ed Berry, physicist: Here we are on January 26, 2016. Do you feel the heat? Do you see the clouds are gone and the sky is glowing red? Ten years ago, on January 25, 2006, Al Gore stood before his Sundance audience at the screening of his β€œAn Inconvenient Truth.” Al Gore waved his quivering finger in the air and told his audience that unless the world takes drastic measures to reduce greenhouse gases within the next 10 years, we will reach a point of no return.

Robert Hargraves, Physicist. Nuclear power is a green environmental solution. The fuel is cheap and inexhaustible. Green nuclear power can solve the global crises of air pollution deaths and climate change. Cheap energy can help developing nations escape poverty and let industrialized nations improve economic growth. Is nuclear power safe? Yes, the primary obstacle to nuclear power is misunderstanding of radiation health effects.