Today: 21.Apr.2018
John Shanahan

John Shanahan

U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Glenn Seaborg, Chairman: Nuclear energy is playing a vital role in the life of every man, woman, and child in the United States today, (1960s). In the years ahead it will affect increasingly all the peoples of the earth. It is essential that all Americans gain an understanding of this vital force if they are to discharge thoughtfully their responsibilities as citizens and if they are to realize fully the myriad benefits that nuclear energy offers them. From the 1960s to the 2010s, the United States lost its way with nuclear energy and promoting the many outstanding by-products due to fear mongering by anti-nuclear organizations and a government that let them succeed. Much of the rest of the world is determined to use the tremendous benefits of nuclear energy and radioisotopes for nuclear medicine etc. to the fullest extent possible. Will the United States get back on track for leadership in science to help the world? - John Shanahan, President of Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA.

Scott Montgomery, Lecturer, University of Washington: Yet if the roughly $3.5 trillion invested in renewable power since 2000 had all backed fission, I believe the advances in that technology would have led all remaining coal- and oil-fired power plants to have disappeared from the face of the Earth by now. And if that same money had instead backed fusion, perhaps a working reactor would now exist.

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Dr. Willie Soon is an independent solar physicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who has been studying the Sun and its influence on the Earth’s climate for more than a quarter of a century. Polar bears are far less endangered by global warming than by environmentalists dreading ice melt. A good puzzle for polar bear science is to answer the question how polar bears survived during the ice ages, when ice covered coastal zones and large parts of the global ocean. Ice was piled miles deep on land, making it extremely difficult for eco systems to provide enough food.

Sebastian Luening, paleogeologist: Die Forsythie blühte in den letzten 30 Jahren immer später. Und das tat sie weil es im Februar und März immer kälter wurde. Das Klima wandelt sich. Aber nicht immer so, wie man es in der Zeitung liest. Wenn man nun über die letzten 30 Jahre (“Klima”) hinausgeht, so trifft man in den 1980er Jahren auf eine Phase, in der der Hamburger Forsythienstrauch schon einmal sehr spät geblüht hat. Das Klima führt ganz offensichtlich eine natürliche Eigendynamik.