Today: 25.Jun.2017
John Shanahan

John Shanahan

Jean-Luc Salanave, Le développementfulgurantdes énergies solaire, photovoltaïque etéolienne,en ce débutde XXIe siècle, nous faitaussi expérimenter leurs inconvénients.La technologie en solutionnera bon nombre,mais intermittence etencombrementdemeurerontdes défauts majeurs de ces deux sources d’énergie tantqu’il y aura des absences de soleil ou de vent,etque 10 milliards de terriens auront besoin de surfaces habitables,cultivables etde forêts. Conclusion Pour satisfaire ses besoins énergétiques,l’homme ne disposera de rien d’autre que des trois seules forces fondamentales que la nature metà sa disposition :la force électromagnétique (énergies chimiques,combustibles fossiles,biomasse,photovoltaïque,…),la gravitation (énergies hydraulique,éolienne,inertielle,potentielle …) et les forces nucléaires (radioactivité,fission,fusion).

F. Ward Whicker, Emeritus Professor in Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University. He has spent a lifetime out in the mountains of Colorado year round and also out in nature around the world. He presents his observations about changes in climate and ecosystems with conclusions that these changes are due to CO2 from use of fossil fuels.

Kelvin Kemm is a nuclear physicist and Chairman of the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation and Nuclear Africa: With his leadership and the in depth backing by many outstanding scientists, engineers, government leaders and industry managers, South Africa is working to bring advanced nuclear energy and radioisotope production to the region. Please see the 2017 Nuclear Africa Magazine below.

Reuters, Tom Hals, Emily Flitter: In 2012, construction of a Georgia nuclear power plant stalled for eight months as engineers waited for the right signatures and paperwork needed to ship a section of the plant from a factory hundreds of miles away. The approach - building prefabricated sections of the plants before sending them to the construction sites for assembly - was supposed to revolutionize the industry by making it cheaper and safer to build nuclear plants. But Westinghouse miscalculated the time it would take, and the possible pitfalls involved, in rolling out its innovative AP1000 nuclear plants, according to a close examination by Reuters of the projects. The miscalculations underscore the difficulties facing a global industry that aims to build about 160 reactors and is expected to generate around $740 billion in sales of equipment in services in the coming decade, according to nuclear industry trade groups.