Today: 15.Oct.2018

David Ropeik: International consultant on risk perception and risk communication - There are good physical and emotional reasons to fear nuclear radiation. At high enough doses it can cause more than 20 different kinds of cancer. Emotionally, human-made risks scare us more than natural ones (radiation from the sun doesn't scare us as much though it kills many more) and any risk we can’t detect with our senses leaves us feeling vulnerable and powerless and more afraid.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

John Tjostem, microbiology, botany, professor emeritus of biology - Will our children and grandchildren inherit a world that has adequate food and clean energy resources to offer quality of life? Here we examine the need to find a clean and abundant energy source to replace fossil fuels. We also consider the premise that clean and cheap fuel may offer a glimmer of hope for disarming the population bomb. The debate over nuclear power will be a major focus.

Published in Several energy types

Andrew Karam, Popular Mechanics - A powerful earthquake caused a massive tsunami that crashed into Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused multiple nuclear reactor meltdowns.

The Japanese government recently compensated a worker who developed leukemia after receiving just under 20 mSv (about 2 rem) of radiation exposure from the accident. See article by Jerry Cuttler and James Welsh, the acute dose radiation exposure for predicting cancer is considered to be higher than 500 mSv. The 20 mSv dose that the Japanese government compensated a person for is far below the threshold considered to cause leukemia.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Jane Orient practices internal medicine in Arizona, USA. - The number of radiation casualties from the March 2011 meltdown of Fukushima nuclear reactors stands at zero. In Fukushima Prefecture, the casualties from radiation terror number more than 1,600, exceeding direct deaths from the natural disaster. The U.S. is vulnerable to the same radiation terror as occurred in Japan because of using the wrong dose-response model, which is based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNT), for assessing radiation health risks.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

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