Today: 23.Mar.2019
21.Feb.2015 Written by

From its inception in the 1940's, nuclear power as conceived by the United States had a closed fuel cycle. Uranium would be mined and milled, enriched in its fissionable isotope U-235 from the 0.7% found in nature, manufactured into fuel and burned in reactors to generate electricity. As it burned, some of the uranium would be converted to plutonium. Then the spent fuel would be removed and shipped to a central plant where it would be dissolved and reprocessed chemically. The unburned uranium and plutonium would be separated and could be recycled in new fuel. The radioactive fission products would be buried as waste.

21.Feb.2015 Written by

The depleted uranium from the enrichment program can power all of the electrical energy needs of the United States for over 700 years at 1994 levels. This is using fast reactor and spent fuel recycling technologies developed at Argonne National Laboratory.

21.Feb.2015 Written by

Nuclear power is a proven option for baseload electricity generation, but most reactor vendors worldwide currently offer power reactors which are too large for the Australian grid system. A market is emerging worldwide for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), with unit sizes from 25 to 200 MWe, for supplying power in remote locations or to small electricity grids.

21.Feb.2015 Written by

Darrell Fisher presents an excellent overview of medical isotopes, their various methods of production and use in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Today, nuclear medicine is practised in over 100 countries around the world. Tremendous progress has been made in being able to "see" diseases and treat them.

Newsletter Subscription

  • Latest
  • Popular
  • Andrew Kenny, physicist and mechanical engineer: South…
  • Michael Shellenberger, Founder - President of Environmental…
  • Rob Jeffrey, Economic Risk Consultant: Poverty is…
  • David Wojick, Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow,…
  • Andrew Kenny, physicist and mechanical engineer: The…