Today: 13.Nov.2018

Donald Rapp, Former Full Professor of Physics and Environmental Engineering: It has become a fashionable exercise for some to count the number of published climate papers that seem to subscribe to the alarmist agenda. Unfortunately it is thoroughly unclear exactly what that agenda is. Furthermore, the overwhelming majority of published papers are specific, narrowly focused, and relate to a particular aspect of climate change; very few deal with the big picture of climate change vs. greenhouse gases.

The Week That Was, Ken Haapala, Fred Singer, Donald Rapp: “The biggest problem today (I think) in climate matters is that we, as a community of scientists, have succumbed to social pressures and have thereby given up on the scientific method, .. .. .. And so we have become relegated to something akin to the trench warfare that prevailed in WW-I when opposing forces were stalemated into probing attacks that went nowhere."

The topic of catastrophic man-made climate change has been around for decades. In the 1970s, John Holdren introduced the idea of a new ice age caused by human activity. Since the 1980s, he has talked about catastrophic man-made global warming caused by CO2 from use of fossil fuels. In 2015, he issued a "Climate Change Compendium" that is posted on this website. Use the SEARCH Box with keyword "HOLDREN." This response to Holdren's 2015 presentation is by Dr. Donald Rapp, a highly educated and experienced scientist. Rapp is open to the possibility of some local and global warming from use of fossil fuels and mankind's activities. He provides detailed comments to Holdren's predictions of catastrophic man-made global warming. Many scientists agree with Dr. Rapp.

Donald Rapp, Former Full Professor of Physics and Environmental Engineering: The climate of the 19th century wasn’t all that great. It was particularly cold in mid-northern latitudes. Climates always change regardless of human activity. The earth has warmed in the past 120 years, mostly at high northern latitudes; far less in the tropics or southern hemisphere. In many ways, the climate today is “better” than it was in 1850.

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