Today: 25.Jun.2018

Washington Post, Ashley Halsey: As the U.S. goes through a nasty flu season in 2017-18, the 1918 nightmare serves as a reminder that a century of modern medicine might not save millions from dying.

Published in Health

Chris Mooney, Washington Post: The climate change simulations that best capture current planetary conditions are also the ones that predict the most dire levels of human-driven warming. Under a high warming scenario in which large emissions continue throughout the century, the models as a whole give a mean warming of 4.3 degrees Celsius (or 7.74 degrees Fahrenheit), plus or minus 0.7 degrees Celsius, for the period between 2081 and 2100. But the best models gave an answer of 4.8 degrees Celsius (8.64 degrees Fahrenheit), plus or minus 0.4 degrees Celsius. Overall, the change amounted to bumping up the projected warming by about 15 percent.

Washington Post, Ben Guarino, Brady Dennis: Climate change significantly imperils public health globally, according to a new report that chronicles the many hazards and symptoms already being seen. The authors describe its manifestations as “unequivocal and potentially irreversible.” This is similar to what John Holdren, Science Advisor to President Obama says. See Holdren's 100 slide PowerPoint Presentation on this website: "Climate Science & Technology," September 2017, Full title: "The Climate-Change Challenge Today: The Science and the Technological Options."

Sarah Kaplan, The Washington Post: About 700 million years ago, Earth turned into a snowball. The polar ice sheets expanded until they engulfed the globe. The oceans turned to slush. The vast expanses of ice and snow reflected the sun's light back into space, exacerbating the endless winter. Temporary relief came in the form of massive volcanic eruptions, which spewed carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and triggered a period of global warming. But that, too, spiraled out of control. Earth became a greenhouse — its oceans hot enough to cook their inhabitants, its blighted landscape further ravaged by floods. Then, suddenly, something about the shifting continents or ash-darkened skies prompted the planet to cool again. The snowball returned.

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