Today: 25.Jun.2017

F. Ward Whicker, Emeritus Professor in Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University. He has spent a lifetime out in the mountains of Colorado year round and also out in nature around the world. He presents his observations about changes in climate and ecosystems with conclusions that these changes are due to CO2 from use of fossil fuels.

CO2 Coalition, www.co2coalition.org: Mark Twain said, "It is not so much the things we don’t know that get us into trouble. Rather, the mischief is caused by things that we do know that ain’t so.” We “know” that carbon dioxide is “bad for the environment.” (In fact, it is a prerequisite for life.) We “know” that the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is reaching historically dangerous levels. (In fact, we have, these past centuries, been living through a CO2 famine. We “know” that on the subject of climate change, the “science is settled”.

Uli Weber - geophysicist, notrickszone.com, P. Gosselin: Since the G7-Summit (2015) and the Climate Summit COP21 in Paris (2015), the political aim of many governments is to stop use of fossil fuels by 2100 and supposedly save our planet from anthropogenic global warming (AGW). The AGW-paradigm is allegedly supported by 97% of all climate scientists worldwide. Global decarbonisation has even been recommended by some religious leaders. .. .. Should we abandon our excellent living-standards based on fossil fuels and accept these doomsday predictions?

Ken Haapala, SEPP, The Science and Environmental Policy Project - Those promoting fear of carbon dioxide (CO2) primarily use three possible threats: one, dangerous increased temperatures; two, change in ocean chemistry (called ocean acidification); and three, drastic sea level rise. John Christy’s February 2, 2016 testimony to the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space & Technology empirically demolishes the argument that increasing CO2 is causing significant global warming. Another fear is rapid sea level rise. Sea levels have risen about 400 feet, 120 meters, since the maximum extent of the last major Ice Age about 18,000 years ago. They will continue to rise until the onset of the next ice age.

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