Today: 25.Apr.2018

James Conca, scientist in the field of earth and environmental sciences. Contributor to Forbes: Most people have heard of something called externalities, costs not factored into the price. An energy’s deathprint is a rarely-discussed externality. The deathprint is the number of people killed per kWh produced. There is debate on the absolute numbers, but no one debates on the relative ranking from most dangerous to least. It is notable that in media and legislative discussions, the only time death is mentioned is for nuclear, ironic since it has the lowest deathprint of any source.

Published in Several energy types

Roy Spencer, Ph.D. Meteorology: Given current technologies, it makes no sense to destroy $100 Trillion in wealth this century for an unmeasurable reduction in warming. As a lukewarmist I believe (but can’t prove) that humans are probably responsible for some of the recent warming (which has been mostly benign). But until some new energy technology comes along we are stuck with fossil fuels for the foreseeable future. The oil industry’s use of fracking has already reduced carbon dioxide emissions — through a switch from coal to natural gas.

World Nuclear News: According to the International Energy Agency, IEA, some 6.5 million deaths annually are linked to outdoor and indoor air pollution, "with the number set to increase significantly in coming decades unless the energy sector takes greater action to curb emissions." "Energy production and use - mostly from unregulated, poorly regulated or inefficient fuel combustion - are the most important man-made sources of key air pollutant emissions: 85% of particulate matter and almost all of the sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides." NOTE: This far exceeds realistic projections of deaths from increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. CO2 is absolutely essential for life on Earth. "The more the better." Emeritus Professor William Happer, Princeton U. Physics.

Published in Air

National Safety Council, James Maynard, Tech Times: The five leading causes of death in the United States as of 2014 are approximately :1) heart disease, 614,000, 2) cancer, 592,000, 3) accidents, 136,000, 4) stroke, 133,100, 5) Alzheimer's, 93,500 for a total of 1,568,600 per year. The annual deaths from radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power plants is ZERO and has been for fifty years. Some deaths are almost inevitable. Others can be minimized. Radiation safety at commercial nuclear power plants always has been a top priority.

Published in Several energy types

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