Today: 19.Oct.2018

Institute for Energy Research: Coal-fired electricity generation is far cleaner today than ever before. The popular misconception that our air quality is getting worse is wrong, as shown by EPA’s air quality data. Modern coal plants, and those retrofitted with modern technologies to reduce pollution, are a success story and are currently providing 30 percent of our electricity.

Published in Fossil fuels

Investor's Business Daily: It has become an article of faith in the U.S. that recycling is a good thing. But evidence is piling up that recycling is a waste of time and money, and a bit of a fraud. The New York Times recently reported that, unknown to most families who spend hours separating garbage into little recycling bins, much of the stuff ends up in a landfill anyway. One big reason: China has essentially shut the door to U.S. recyclables.

Published in Pollution

Alan Taylor, writer for The Atlantic: June 5, 2018 is marked by the United Nations as World Environment Day, a day set aside since 1974 to promote “worldwide awareness and action for the protection of our environment.” This year’s theme is “beat plastic pollution.” Some advocates for nuclear power claim that nuclear energy can be implemented worldwide in a few decades. They also claim that the world is being destroyed by carbon dioxide from use of fossil fuels. Will people who are struggling to get through life in very polluted environments take good care of nuclear power plants through their full life cycle? These people need fossil fuels to improve their lives and economies. Canada, France, South Korea and Switzerland are examples of countries who are using nuclear power exceptionally well.

Published in Pollution

CNN Wire: A huge, swirling pile of trash in the Pacific Ocean is growing faster than expected and is now three times the size of France. The bulk of the pile is made up of larger objects while only 8% of the mass is microplastics, or pieces smaller than 5 millimeters in size. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch was first discovered in 1997 by oceanographer Charles Moore when he sailed home to Southern California after finishing the Transpacific Yacht Race, from California to Hawaii. “I was confronted, as far as the eye could see, with the sight of plastic,” wrote Moore about his discovery in Natural History.

Published in Pollution

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