Today: 23.Feb.2018

Thomas Cochran has been working with the Natural Resources Defense Council since the 1970s to stop the use of nuclear power, particularly the kind that uses most of the potential energy and produces the least amount of radioactive waste. Harold A. Feiveson is Senior Research Policy Scientist at Princeton University's Center for Energy and Environmental Studies. Dr. Feiveson's principal research interests are in the fields of nuclear weapons and nuclear energy policy. Frank von Hippel is Professor and Co-Director of Program on Science and Global Security at Princeton University and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.: This article chronicles the rise and fall of fast-reactor research in the United States.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Thomas Cochran has been working with the Natural Resources Defense Council since the 1970s to impede the use of nuclear power, particularly the kind that uses most of the potential energy and produces the lease amount of radioactive waste:In an effort to promote nuclear power, the Department of Energy has launched a 30- to 50- year international research effort to explore new nuclear reactor and fuel processing technologies. According to Dr. Thomas Cochran, the director of NRDC’s nuclear program, the project is unlikely to result in deployment of new commercial nuclear fuel technologies, but will greatly increase the risk of prolifieration of nuclear weapons.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Thomas Cochran has been working with the Natural Resources Defense Council since the 1970s to stop the use of nuclear power, particularly the kind that uses most of the potential energy and produces the lease amount of radioactive waste: In the United States the high cost of new nuclear power plants, their lengthy construction period, the current dependence on large federal subsidies and incentives to stimulate private investment in the sector, unresolved waste management and disposal issues, and a massive requirement to replace the current installed base of nuclear plants before 2050, will all make it difficult for nuclear to make a significantly greater contribution to carbon reductions than is already being contributed by today's fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants.

Published in Energy Today

Gary Young, mechanical engineer, major product development manager - Before retirement, he worked on product development that significantly contributed to profitability of a global technology company: How do solar, wind, hydro, fossil fuels and nuclear compare for energy return on investment? What will happen if the United States does not continue with a second generation of nuclear power plants?

Published in Energy Tomorrow

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