Today: 23.Feb.2018

Ken Kok is a nuclear engineer and leading member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers advocating for advanced nuclear power technology with spent fuel recycling. Mechanical engineers contributed significantly to the development of many nuclear power technologies.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

Andres Daniels, Writer about ultra-modern history: nuclear power, radiation, post-Cold War (1989-), Rwanda, modern Afghanistan, and Japan: The discovery of fission created a new kind of fear, not simply a new iteration of the previous responses to new technology. This new fear was profound, disquieting and all encompassing. By the time nuclear power was introduced, anxiety and concern about nuclear weapons had already fostered perceptions that left a long-lasting legacy that would taint nuclear power for decades. It is time to overcome the general aversion to learning about this important energy source, and to understand this key technology. In an age of rising air pollution, it has never been more crucial.

Published in Energy Today

John Shanahan, civil engineer, President of Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA: China, France, Russia, South Korea are countries with a bright future for nuclear power, even oil exporting countries have plans for nuclear power. The United States has minimal plans beyond the first generation of commercial power plants. This is disgraceful. The anti-nuclear organizations, spokespersons, and the public that agree with them can cheer for the moment. Modern societies need fossil fuels and nuclear power to prosper for the long term future. Things have to change and will.

Published in Energy Tomorrow

James Conca, scientist in the field of earth and environmental sciences. Contributor to Forbes: Most people have heard of something called externalities, costs not factored into the price. An energy’s deathprint is a rarely-discussed externality. The deathprint is the number of people killed per kWh produced. There is debate on the absolute numbers, but no one debates on the relative ranking from most dangerous to least. It is notable that in media and legislative discussions, the only time death is mentioned is for nuclear, ironic since it has the lowest deathprint of any source.

Published in Energy Today

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