Today: 18.Jun.2018

Donald Miller, MD: Fearful of the harm that radiation can do, the citizens of Sacramento, in a public referendum, had the city shut down its Rancho Seco nuclear power plant. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District put up windmills instead, which on a windy day produces 1 percent of the power the nuclear plant did.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Ludwig Feinendegen, M.D., former director of the Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Germany, 2010 Marie Curie Prize - Jerry Cuttler, D.Sc. in nuclear sciences and engineering, recipient of 2011 International Dose-Response Society Award for Outstanding Career Achievement: There is considerable controversy regarding risk of health detriment after low-level exposure to ionizing radiation. This stems in part from a sort of distance between radiation biologists, epidemiologists, and radiation protection professionals, as well as regulatory institutions. This feeds seriously into a somewhat hazy fear of ionizing radiation that besets large portions of the public.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Alan Waltar, nuclear engineer, Past President of the American Nuclear Society, Chair ANS - HPS Joint Topical Conference on Applicability of Radiation-Response Models to Low Dose Protection Standards, October 1 - 3, 2018: Preliminary Program. This conference addresses one of the most important issues facing nuclear power and nuclear medicine, how to establish realistic low dose radiation protection standards. Since the beginning of use of nuclear power in the 1950s, the arbitrary Linear No-Threshold Model with Collective Dose Corollary has been used with results that vastly over predict deaths due to exposure to low dose radiation. This has added tremendous costs, held back the use of nuclear power and limited the use of nuclear medicine. This conference aims at working to establish a low dose protection standard that is based on reality of living organisms rather than an unrealistic arbitrary set of rules.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Wade Allison, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Oxford University, UK: Nuclear energy can affect life when a nucleus decays, releasing energy as radiation. Everything, even our own bodiees, contains some natural radioactivity, and nuclear radiation shines on us from space too. If it had been really dangerous, life would have died out aeons ago, when radiation flux was more intense than it is today. To survive the oxidative damage caused by radiation and oxygen, life has evolved a series of amazingly clever design features and strategies.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

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