Today: 15.Nov.2018

S. Kojima, Tokyo U. of Science, M. Thukimoto, Tokyo U. of Science, Jerry Cuttler, Cuttler Assoc., K. Inoguchi, Drainage Co., T. Ootaki, Ootaki Clinic, N. Shimura, Ohu U., H. Koga, Lead and Company, A. Murata, Lead and Company - All in Japan, except J. Cuttler in Canada: This article reports on the near-complete recovery of a patient who had been suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis, RA, for 10 years. Such a long-term course of treatments and follow-up maintenance for RA could be carried out in any hospital that has these low-dose radiation therapy rooms. After six months of this treatment, the pain throughout her body almost disappeared. After two years of treatment, her appetite and muscular strength were restored.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

John Cardarelli II, Captain US Public Health Service Officer, Cincinnati, OH, USA, Brant Ulsh, M. H. Chew & Associates, Livermore, CA, USA: The USEPA uses the linear no-threshold (LNT) model to estimate cancer risks and determine cleanup levels in radiologically contaminated environments. The LNT model implies that there is no safe dose of ionizing radiation; however, adverse effects from low dose, low-dose rate (LDDR) exposures are not detectable.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Mohn Doss, Medical Physicist in Diagnostic Imaging: The LNT Era (Linear No Threshold) has not ended yet. But, there are signs that we may be approaching its end. The problem with the LNT model for radiation-induced cancer is the absence of threshold results in the fear of the smallest amount of radiation. The LNT model was adopted by advisory bodies in the 1950 and has been endorsed by them repeatedly. Low-dose radiation boosts the immune system and so it should lead to reduction of cancers, a phenomenon known as radiation hormesis. Conclusion: The LNT mmodel is not valid and lives are being lost because of the LNT model and unjustified fear of low-dose radiation.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Donald Miller, MD: Fearful of the harm that radiation can do, the citizens of Sacramento, in a public referendum, had the city shut down its Rancho Seco nuclear power plant. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District put up windmills instead, which on a windy day produces 1 percent of the power the nuclear plant did.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

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