Today: 18.Nov.2018

The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of ionizing-radiation-induced cancer is based on the assumption that every radiation dose increment constitutes increased cancer risk for humans. The risk is hypothesized to increase linearly as the total dose increases. While this model is the basis for radiation safety regulations, its scientific validity has been questioned and debated for many decades. The recent memorandum of the International Commission on Radiological Protection admits that the LNT-model predictions at low doses are “speculative, unproven, undetectable and ‘phantom’.” The authors have made this report available at (http://www.pubfacts.com/author/Brant+Ulsh)

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Current radiation protection philosophy is based on the linear no-threshold (LNT) theory. This theory postulates that any dose of ionizing radiation, no matter how small, causes a finite increase in cancer risk. The LNT theory does not predict any qualitative differences in effects between low doses delivered at low dose-rates (LDDR) and high doses delivered at high dose-rates (HDDR), It does not allow for the possibility that LDDR may decrease risks, and it does not account for nonlinear modifiers of risk. Brant Ulsh has made this report available at (http://www.researchgate.net/publication/234099731_The_new_radiobiology_returning_to_our_roots)

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Jeffrey Mahn, Ionizing Radiation Risk - Risk Issues are Emotional. Solutions are Technical. Decisions are Political.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Richard Rhodes and Denis Beller describe the need for nuclear power.The world needs more energy. Energy multiplies human labor, increasing productivity. It builds and lights schools, purifies water, powers farm machinery, drives sewing machines and robot assemblers, stores and moves information. World population is steadily increasing, having passed six billion in 1999. Yet one-third of that number — two billion people — lack access to electricity. Development depends on energy, and the alternative to development is suffering: poverty, disease, and death.

Published in Nuclear

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