Today: 19.Oct.2018

Mark Mills, economics21.org: Not satisfied with the mere claim that solar and wind are reaching parity with the costs of conventional energy technologies, green enthusiasts are upping the ante claiming that by “2030, the cost [of solar] could be so near to zero it will effectively be free.” But no amount of research or torturing of reality, however, will lead to that result. Both physics and history offer instructive lessons. That scenario has played out in Germany and Britain, both far further down the green path, leading to radically higher electricity prices there — 200% to 300% higher than in America.

Published in Wind and Solar

Bjorn Lomborg - When a “solution” to a problem causes more damage than the problem, policymaking has gone awry. That’s where we often find ourselves with global warming today. Actihttp://www.efn-usa.org/administrator/index.php?option=com_k2&view=itemsvist organizations like Worldwatch argue that higher temperatures will make more people hungry, so drastic carbon cuts are needed. But a comprehensive new study published in Nature Climate Change led by researchers from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis has found that strong global climate action would cause far more hunger and food insecurity than climate change itself.

Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow: Young Americans for Liberty Conference - I hope you're prepared to have some fun actively engaging in a little exercise to discover how the world really works. I know some of you have read my books and articles – and heard me talk about how eco-imperialists deny the world’s poorest people access to the modern energy, agriculture, disease control and other technologies that make our jobs, living standards, travel, entertainment, communication, health and life spans possible. After countless thousands of years of stagnation, wallowing near the abyss, living little better than domesticated animals … what brought about this incredible transformation?

Published in Fossil fuels

Sebastian Luening, paleogeologist: In the Baltic Sea region, there have been demonstrable major climatic fluctuations over the last 1000 years. Warm and colder periods alternated, with major consequences for the lives of plants, animals and humans. During the "medieval warm period" between 950 and 1250 AD, the northern hemisphere, including the Baltic Sea region, had higher-than-average temperatures compared to the periods before and after. The summer of 2018 experienced warmer than normal temperatures in the Baltic region, making it difficult for those used to air conditioning in the United States to sleep without this convenience after a day of bicycling in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Is this due to man's use of fossil fuels? This paleogeologist shows similar warm periods over the last 1000 years.

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