Today: 15.Jan.2019

Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow: The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and dominant, government-funded climate research have gone from seeking to identify human influences on Earth’s climate … to decreeing that only human influences matter, natural forces no longer play a meaningful role, and humans can control climate and weather by eliminating fossil fuels and regulating atmospheric greenhouse gas levels. Those assertions now have the unwavering support of an entire industry – the $1.5-trillion-per-year Climate Industrial Complex: politicians, regulators, researchers, industrialists and activists, who protect and advance alarmist claims, promote allegedly “renewable” energy, resist examination and reform, and denounce anyone who questions climate chaos orthodoxy as “planet-threatening climate change deniers.”

Jerry Cuttler, D.Sc. in nuclear sciences and engineering, recipient of 2011 International Dose-Response Society Award for Outstanding Career Achievement: Nuclear energy has been very good for our environment. The air, water and land around nuclear plants are clean and healthy. Their design, construction, operation and decommissioning are performed carefully, based on many plant-years of shared knowledge and experience. The amount of energy obtained brim splitting one atom of uranium is enormous - about forty million times the amount of energy obtained from burning one atom of carbon.

Published in Nuclear

Charles Mackay, author, journalist: Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is an early study of crowd psychology by Scottish journalist Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. The book was published in three volumes: "National Delusions", (Economic Bubbles), "Peculiar Follies", (Crusades, Witch mania), and "Philosophical Delusions" (Alchemists).

Published in People - General

Ray DiLorenzo, Editor, Stand Up America: Slaves from Africa bore most of the burden, but slaves from countries like Ireland were also used. Irish slaves came to America as early as 1625 when James II sold 30,000 Irish prisoners as slaves to the New World. It is estimated that approximately 100,000 Irish men, women, and children were transported to the colonies as slaves. Not to be called racist, Britain, in the 17th and 18th centuries, was an equal opportunity exploiter of human flesh, having sold over 600,000 Irish, Scottish, and Catholics into slavery. In early America, slavery was not a race issue, it was primarily a financial one.

Published in People - General

Newsletter Subscription

  • Latest
  • Popular
  • Alan Waltar, nuclear engineer, Past President of…
  • Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the…
  • Paul Driessen, senior policy analyst for the…
  • National Economics Editorial Staff: Renewable energy advocates…
  • Brian Wang: China was planning to use…
  • Alan Waltar, nuclear engineer, Past President of…