Today: 19.Oct.2018

David MacKay, Professor of Physics, University of Cambridge: How can we power a modern lifestyle without fossil fuels? Individual actions saving 10% here and 40% there will not get us off fossil fuels. To eliminate fossil fuel use, we will surely also need to increase the amount of energy we get from non-fossil-fuel sources. Even if we imagine strong efficiency measures and smart technology switches, halving our energy consumption from 125 kWh per day per person to 60 kWh per day, we should not kid ourselves about the scale of the energy challenge which would remain. If Britain and the United States were to "get off" fossil fuels, what would the effect be on Earth's climate? Most of the rest of the world can not afford to "get off" fossil fuels or do not have the right governments, economies, education systems, industrial capacity to do so.

Published in Several energy types

John Droz is the publisher of "Energy and Environmental Newsletter." Once you’ve grasped the magnitude of the problems with wind, solar, biofuels, etc., you’ll understand why the Russians have put so much effort into promoting US energy policies that are completely nonsensical — to anyone but them. The ONLY solution is to change our energy policies to be Science-based — starting with dumping the absurd “All of the Above” slogan, and replacing it with “All of the Sensible” as a national energy mantra.

Capell Aris, Fellow of the Institute of Engineering and Technology: This paper assesses the cost effectiveness of installing a battery for storage of electricity generated by solar PV rooftop panels. Solar PV can reduce grid import by as much as 40% without need of battery storage. Consumers can shift electric demand to the solar peak production. The low level of winter solar generation in the UK means that battery storage will not be worthwhile.

Published in Wind and Solar

Howard Cork Hayden, Emeritus Physics Professor, University of Connecticut: A generation ago, nobody considered Supercharging stations for battery-powered cars, the idea of which had been abandoned well over a century ago. The problems in 1900 were two: the batteries and the charging system. The problems in 2017 are two: the batteries and the charging system. Before the government provides more financial support to Tesla, it should examine the problems identified here with solar powered charging stations and grid powered charging stations at home. Introducing / forcing a new technology on consumers is far more than building an electric car and developing new batteries.

Published in Several energy types

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