Today: 25.Apr.2018

Wade Allison, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Oxford University, UK: Nuclear energy can affect life when a nucleus decays, releasing energy as radiation. Everything, even our own bodiees, contains some natural radioactivity, and nuclear radiation shines on us from space too. If it had been really dangerous, life would have died out aeons ago, when radiation flux was more intense than it is today. To survive the oxidative damage caused by radiation and oxygen, life has evolved a series of amazingly clever design features and strategies.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Wade Allison, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Keble College, Oxford University, UK: Wade Allison is one of Europe's leading science professors and public educators on the subject of low dose radiation. In this essay, he offers a short reflection on where Europe and the UK are today and where they are going.

Published in United Kingdom

Wade Allison, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Oxford University, UK: Bottom up, on radiation and nuclear energy we need a fresh programme of science-wide public education in schools and in the community as a whole via the media, omitting the ghoulish images used in the past. Local UK-based initiatives should contribute to worldwide re-education, for example through the BBC. Top down, on radiation safety we need a complete sea change in international guidance. This should be based on scientific understanding and evidence, not the unjustified precaution inherent in the ALARA/LNT philosophy.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

Wade Allison, Professor Emeritus of Physics, Oxford University - This book expands on the message of Radiation and Reason (2009) following the Fukushima accident (2011). It is a broader study of the historical, cultural and scientific interactions of radiation with life; it asks why society takes such a cautious view of nuclear technology; it looks at the effects of nuclear accidents and other radiation exposures; it looks at the efficacy of safety, as provided by nature and as imposed by regulation; it explains how biological evolution prepared life to survive exposures to low and moderate levels of radiation; it asks if nuclear energy would be expensive, if normal levels of information, education, safety and design were applied.

Published in Low Dose Radiation

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