Today: 24.Jun.2017

Steven Lyazi is a member of the EFN-USA Board of Advisors in Kampala, Uganda. This article expresses his views about people in North America and Europe who intend to impose their plans to limit use of fossil fuels in Africa and around the world in the name of supposed catastrophic man-made global warming. Far worse than any effects from man-made global warming will be mass starvation from lack of fossil fuels and the benefits of all their by-products.

Published in Uganda

The central purpose of efn-usa.org is to focus on the potential goodness in mankind and the wonders of nature and the environment. But, reality frequently interferes. This article by Paul Driessen of the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow, CFACT, describes how extremely wealthy and powerful people are enriching themselves and abusing humanity and the environment. James Lovelock: "The climate is doing its usual tricks. There's nothing much really happening yet. We were supposed to be halfway toward a frying world now."

Published in People - The Americas

Judith Curry, Pope Francis: From the Vatican - World leaders meeting at the Vatican for a conference on climate change have issued a final statement, declaring that “human-induced climate change is a scientific reality” and “its decisive mitigation is a moral and religious imperative for humanity.” The statement says that humans have the technological and financial means, and the know-how, to combat human-induced climate change, while at the same time eliminating global poverty. Judith Curry - The debate on climate change has centered on the science and economic cost/benefit analyses – both of which are dominated by deep uncertainties. The moral dimensions of the climate change problem have received short shrift.

Ronald Bailey, reason.com: Thirty Years ago, 20 million Americans participated in the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970. The organizers of Earth Day 2000 expect 500 million people around the globe to participate in celebrations, workshops, and demonstrations. Earth Day 1970 provoked a torrent of apocalyptic predictions. "We have about five more years at the outside to do something." Three decades later, the world hasn't come to an end; if anything, the planet's ecological future has never looked so promising. Now is a good time to look back on the predictions made at the first Earth Day and see how they've held up and what we can learn from them.

Published in People - General

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