Today: 24.Sep.2018
People (138)

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People - General

People - General (52)

This section covers historical highlights of people in general. It exams what can be done to make the future better than the past, including how plentiful, reliable energy can help. Contributions are from people in all walks of life.

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People - Asia, South Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand

People - Asia, South Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand (16)

This section covers historical highlights of people in Asia, South Pacific, Australia and New Zealand. It exams what can be done to make the future better than the past, including how plentiful, reliable energy can help. Contributions are from people in all walks of life.

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People - The Americas

People - The Americas (39)

This section covers historical highlights of people in South, Central and North America. It exams what can be done to make the future better than the past, including how plentiful, reliable energy can help. Contributions are from people in all walks of life.

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People - Africa

People - Africa (11)

This section covers historical highlights of people in Africa and the Middle East. It exams what can be done to make the future better than the past, including how plentiful, reliable energy can help. Contributions are from people in all walks of life.

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People - Europe and Middle East

People - Europe and Middle East (16)

This section covers historical and present day highlights of people in Europe and Russia. It exams what can be done to make the future better than the past and present, including how plentiful, reliable energy can help.

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Health

Health (2)

This section discusses global health issues in general.

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Life (biological history)

Life (biological history) (2)

This section discusses the evolution of the human race in general.

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27.Feb.2018 Written by

Ben Johnson, Historic UK: By the late 1800s, large cities all around the world were “drowning in horse manure”. In order for these cities to function, they were dependent on thousands of horses for the transport of both people and goods. The manure on London’s streets also attracted huge numbers of flies which then spread typhoid fever and other diseases. Similar issues of waste from low energy density energy sources like wind and solar apply, without the stench and disease spreading flies.

26.Feb.2018 Written by

Paul 't Hart, Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences Research Fellow: Irving Janis' study of Groupthink has had a major influence on students of group processes, decision-making, and management. It has influenced international-relations analysts in their efforts to understand the dynamics of the occurrence and resolution of international crises (including regional wars on up to world wars).

16.Feb.2018 Written by

David Allan Adams, U.S. Navy (Retired): Since the end of World War II, the U.S. armed forces have proved largely inept at exercising military power as an instrument of national policy. Retired Navy Admiral James Stavridis concedes that “we have become less successful over the past decades, beginning with the failures in Vietnam and continuing to the frustrations today in Iraq and Afghanistan.” The cause of these military struggles, Harlan Ullman claims, is an inability of the nation’s political leaders to think in coherent strategic terms. Similar problems exist with coherent energy planning.

15.Feb.2018 Written by

Bret Stephens, New York Times: People like Bill McKibben and Naomi Klein have made careers saying more or less the same thing - that affluence is not our greatest achievement but our biggest problem. This is a world where the clock is permanently set at two minutes to midnight, and where only a radical transformation of modern society (usually combining dramatic changes in personal behavior along with a heavy dose of state intervention) can save us. Above all, the Vogtians say, we need less: less consumption, less stuff, fewer people, and so on.

15.Feb.2018 Written by

Llewellyn King is executive producer and host of "White House Chronicle" on PBS: The SpaceX Falcon heavy rocket launch on February 6, 2018 was a showcase of American technology and know-how. It was a clear statement that the individual can still triumph in the United States. Although he made his first $500 selling a game program when he was 12, and his first billion as a founder of PayPal, Musk's real claim to fame is as an engineer and physicist. His Tesla electric car may not survive as the industry leader, but today it is out front.

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