Today: 20.Nov.2017

Seth Wynes, Kimberly Nicholas: Current anthropogenic climate change is the result of greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere, which records the aggregation of billions of individual decisions. Here we consider a broad range of individual lifestyle choices and calculate their potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries. We recommend four widely applicable high-impact (i.e. low emissions) actions with the potential to contribute to systemic change and substantially reduce annual personal emissions: having one fewer child, living car-free, avoiding airplane travel and eating a plant-based diet. These actions have much greater potential to reduce emissions than commonly promoted strategies like comprehensive recycling or changing household lightbulbs.

Calvin Beisner, Cornwall Alliance: For 218 years—since Thomas Robert Malthus published the first edition of his Essay on the Principle of Population—people have been coming up with new rationales for limiting or even reducing human population. Julian Simon, in The Ultimate Resource and I in Prospects for Growth: A Biblical View of Population, Resources, and the Future, provided both theoretical and empirical evidence that such fears were baseless. If people are fundamentally consumers and polluters, as extreme environmentalists picture them, it may make sense to try to reduce population size. If they are instead made in the image of God (Genesis 1:26) to be creative and productive, then His instruction for them to “be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it and have dominion over” everything in it makes better sense.

Paul Driessen, Senior Policy Advisor for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow: This recaps testimony by four scientist witnesses at the recent House Science Committee hearings on assumptions, policy implications and scientific principles of climate change. Junk science is being used to justify demands that the United States and world eliminate the carbon-based fuels that provide 80% of the energy that makes modern industry, civilization and living standards possible – and that are needed to lift billions more people out of poverty and disease.

Terry Gross, NPR, David Owen, New Yorker: We're going to start this interview with the subject of David Owen's new book, "Where The Water Goes," about the Colorado River. The river and its tributaries supply water to over 36 million people in seven states - Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona and California - and irrigates close to 6 million acres of farmland. Owen writes about the engineering feats that make all that possible and the legal and environmental battles surrounding the river. The Colorado River is so overtaxed that by the time it reaches the U.S.-Mexico border it's dry. This question can be repeated for rivers and ground water around the world. Each river that is overused destroys the land and water ecology. There are solutions, if we look far enough.

Published in Oceans, Rivers, Lakes

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